Find a list of your saved stories here

U. physician honored for work in virology, named as national fellow

U. physician honored for work in virology, named as national fellow


Save Story

Save stories to read later


Estimated read time: Less than a minute

This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

SALT LAKE CITY — A distinguished physician and researcher with the division of infectious diseases at the University of Utah's School of Medicine has been elected as a fellow to the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Dr. Sankar Swaminathan, who is recognized for his work in the field of virology, and particularly with viruses associated with the development of cancer, will join 90 other physicians and scientists from across the United States and abroad who are being honored this year by the IDSA.

His work focuses on the regulation of gene expression in Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus. In his role as division chief at the U., Swaminathan is working to make both basic science and clinical research priorities within the division, specifically in the areas of HIV, infections in immunocompromised patients and travel medicine.

Swaminathan was nominated by his peers and met specified IDSA criteria, including a continuing identification with the field of infectious diseases, national or local recognition and publication of their work.

The society, which has more than 9,000 members, was founded in 1963 and is based in Arlington, Va.

Email:wleonard@ksl.com

Most recent Utah stories

Related topics

Utah
Wendy Leonard

    STAY IN THE KNOW

    Get informative articles and interesting stories delivered to your inbox weekly. Subscribe to the KSL.com Trending 5.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast