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Staffing company fails to pay woman for hours of work



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DAVIS COUNTY -- A Davis County woman has been waiting weeks to get paid for work she did earlier this month. The Utah Labor Commission says they've been getting calls about similar situations with the same company.

The Cash for Clunkers program seemed like the perfect way for Sasha Cuno to make some quick money. Staffing company Spherion set her up with a temp job that handled program details.

"All the information the dealership submitted we would verify whether or not it would be approved or rejected," said Cuno.

Starting Sept. 3 and ending Sept. 11, Cuno worked more than 60 hours. Her paychecks for the hours were both approved. Cuno was told she would be paid every Friday, but has yet to see a single paycheck.

Now back to being a full-time stay-at-home mom, Cuno says she's tired of waiting for the money she's owed. She's tried getting answers from Spherion, but hasn't gotten far.

So she called the Utah Labor Commission. "They told me they were also getting calls about Spherion and I should file a form with them," Cuno said.

The Utah Labor Commission confirmed that with KSL 5 News, although they say they have not yet had a formal complaint filed against the company.

Spherion corporate representatives did not return our phone calls but issued the following statement via e-mail.:

"Spherion is one of the largest employers in North America, placing hundreds of thousands of people a year in temporary and permanent positions. We take matters like this very seriously and are taking the appropriate action to address our employees' concerns."

Shortly after our interview, Cuno says she received a call from Spherion. They told her if she wanted to take out money from a quick loan center for the amount she's owed, they'd pay the interest. She declined.

All she wants is the money she earned from the company that hired her.

"I went and sat there, did the work, held up my end of the bargain," she said.

Cuno figures she's owed about $800. She plans to use it on household expenses.

E-mail: sdallof@ksl.com

Sarah Dallof

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