News / Utah / 

Rough economy doesn't mean you have to hate your job

Rough economy doesn't mean you have to hate your job



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

SALT LAKE CITY -- Some surveys show people feel like this bad job market means they are stuck with a bad boss, awful co-workers, or unsatisfying work. But LDS Business College Career Services Director Steve Asay says you can find a new job if you want it.

"Not by going to the newspaper, not by going online, but by who do I know, and knocking on doors to find those positions," he said.

Asay says big companies may post a job opening and get flooded with hundreds of resumes and applications. He says personal contacts will get you further than anything else toward a new job.

"You stay in touch with people not just in a crisis but throughout. And you're always looking -- what's the next opportunity for me, where I can contribute to an organization?" Asay said.

Asay says these times can be a time to reevaluate what you are good at, what you want to do, and what will make you happy.

"If you're in a position where you can utilize your strengths, you're probably not going to be as miserable," he said.

Asay says on the day you start a new job, start looking for your next one by keeping your resume updated, your portfolio fresh, and your contacts in place. He says these days, people will average between 10 and 14 jobs by the time they are 40, and have five to eight careers by the time they are 65.

E-mail: mrichards@ksl.com

Related Links

Mary Richards

    SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

    Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast