Demolition underway for South Jordan home where 20 pounds of explosives were discovered


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SOUTH JORDAN — A South Jordan home where 20 pounds of explosives were discovered last summer after the owner was involved in a shootout with police will finally be demolished and burned starting Tuesday, officials said.

Crews will begin demolishing the home at 3371 W. Snow Moon Place, South Jordan officials said in a news release. The process involves destroying and removing the walls and roof of the house, burning the basement and any material in it, and removing the foundation, the release said.

"Our residents can be assured that every precaution has been taken to ensure the safety of everyone involved and the neighborhood," South Jordan public information officer Rachel Van Cleave said.

The demolition fire will burn hot, and smoke will be seen in the area. Residents near the property will be given the option to leave their homes during the demolition. Special fans designed to keep smoke out of homes will be offered to any remaining residents. City officials have also been working with the Salt Lake County Health Department and Utah Department of Environmental Quality to make sure air quality remains safe and healthy for residents during the demolition process, Van Cleave said.

Nearby businesses won't need to be evacuated, and traffic impacts will be minimal, the city said.

On July 23, 2020, law enforcement officials served a search warrant at the home, owned by 43-year-old Ryan Lynn McManigal. Police had been investigating him for about a week after he made threatening comments at a nearby fast food restaurant, according to charging documents.

Officers responded on July 23 to serve the warrant and called McManigal to try to convince him to surrender. But when officers pulled up to the house in an armored vehicle, McManigal shot at the vehicle at least 13 times, according to the charges. Shortly after, McManigal's gun jammed, and he surrendered to police.

After he was taken into custody, McManigal claimed to have large amounts of the explosive chemicals triacetone triperoxide, also known as TATp, and methyl ethyl ketone peroxide, also known as MEKp, in the house. Investigators later discovered about 20 pounds of explosives in the house — the largest amount some bomb experts had ever seen in-person, police said.

TATp has been referred to as "Mother of Satan" and has been used in multiple terrorist attacks in the last decade. McManigal's sister told detectives that she had applied for a protective order against him after he threatened to kill her and multiple other family members, charges state. Investigators believed McManigal intended to deliver the explosives to some of his family members.

Most of the explosives in McManigal's house were detonated on-site on July 24, 2020, after bomb experts determined the substances couldn't be safely removed from the home. The force of those blasts damaged load-bearing walls in the house, and "lifted the entire first floor of the home several inches off of the foundation," according to a civil lawsuit filed earlier this year by South Jordan officials attempting to gain control of the home in order to demolish it.

The lawsuit called the house a "literal minefield." Though most of the TATp was detonated last July, some of the crystallized, volatile substance may have splashed onto walls of the home or seeped under carpets, the lawsuit speculated.

Ryan Lynn McManigal, 42, of South Jordan, faces attempted aggravated murder and other charges after police say he shot at officers and forced the evacuation of a South Jordan neighborhood during the July 24, 2020, holiday because bomb making materials were found in his house.
Ryan Lynn McManigal, 42, of South Jordan, faces attempted aggravated murder and other charges after police say he shot at officers and forced the evacuation of a South Jordan neighborhood during the July 24, 2020, holiday because bomb making materials were found in his house. (Photo: Salt Lake County Jail)

In October, a man working on the home suffered critical injuries when another explosion was triggered at the home. The man stepped on an area where some crystallized TATp was located, and the pressure was enough to detonate an explosion, according to the lawsuit.

The only way to completely eradicate the explosive substances from the property would be to collapse the home, burn it, and remove all the debris, the city said in the lawsuit. Any materials removed from the property after the demolition will be taken to a remote part of a landfill and buried, the city's news release said.

McManigal remains the property owner and will decide what will happen to the property moving forward, according to the city.

McManigal faces multiple felony charges including attempted murder, possession or use of a weapon of mass destruction and criminal mischief. His next court appearance is set for Aug. 10.

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