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Trial date set for for Kiplyn Davis' accused murderer

By Sam Penrod | Posted - Dec. 3, 2010 at 4:30 p.m.



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PROVO -- The murder case against Timmy Brent Olsen, the man accused in the death of missing Spanish Fork teenager Kiplyn Davis, is back on track.

The road to a trial hasn't been a speedy one, but beginning mid-March of 2011 a jury will begin to hear the evidence against Olsen, which Kiplyn's family hopes will lead to some answers.

"We are here to fight for Kiplyn and try to bring her back," said Richard Davis, Kiplyn's father. "That's all I want, is to know what happened to Kiplyn and to put her in her proper place."

Kiplyn Davis was last seen May 2, 1995
Kiplyn Davis was last seen May 2, 1995

#Kiplyn_Davis

Kiplyn Davis disappeared on May 2, 1995, when she was 15 years old and a student at Spanish Fork High School.

Her body has never been found, but her former classmate Timmy Olsen has been at the center of suspicion for some time.

The case has been stalled for months, after the defense wanted to move the trial out of Utah County in an attempt to find an impartial jury.

Timmy Brent Olsen
Timmy Brent Olsen

Kiplyn's family believes Olsen and others, who have been convicted of perjury in her disappearance, could have resolved this for everyone involved a long time ago.

"If somebody would have just come forward, this would have all been taken care of and people that would have served time would have been able to be back with their families and friends and living a normal life instead of being in jail," Richard Davis said. "We would be living a normal life and we'd know where Kiplyn was, but that's the way it is."

In January it will have been five years since Olsen was charged with murder. The case against Olsen is mostly circumstantial; There is no forensic evidence in the case, but witnesses claim Olsen admitted to being involved in Davis' death.

Prosecuting a murder case without a body has been successful before, but it is still difficult to convince a jury.

Olsen still faces a lengthy sentence in federal prison from the perjury charge, regardless of the outcome of the murder case.

E-mail: spenrod@ksl.com

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Sam Penrod

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