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Police Looking for Suspects Manufacturing Counterfeit Money

Police Looking for Suspects Manufacturing Counterfeit Money



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Sandra Yi and Alex Cabrero Reporting

Police in Layton are investigating after counterfeit cash was passed at local businesses.

Police have seen everything from 10 dollar bills to 100s in the past few weeks. If you look at those bills closely, you can tell something's just not right. The three $100 bills have the same serial number. Also, some of the numbers have been colored in with gold glitter marker.

Even so, they were good enough that clerks at several businesses didn't notice, and accepted them.

Asst. Chief Craig Gibson, Layton City Police Dept.: "Obviously they business is out, each business is out $100. If they get passed, get passed a couple of times, somebody will be out the money."

Police say, the bills -- a 10, 20 and $400 bills -- were passed over several days last month at a 7-11 store, a Neighborhood Walmart, and Blockbuster. Police say the suspects purchased small-ticket items, including groceries.

Investigators are trying to figure out who is using them and manufacturing them. They have three suspects and surveillance video of one of them at a 7-11 in Layton.

At the Village Hearth in Layton, Julieanne Gibby and Carol DeClue have been a lot more careful about the cash they accept lately.

Carol DeClue, The Village Hearth: "It is really frustrating. It's terrible to think there are people out there who look to take advantage of other people."

Many businesses check for threads, coloring, and watermarks.

Carol DeClue, The Village Hearth: "You can see it under the light, but if you hold it down, you can't see it."

But as a customer, when you get cash back, do you check?

Marjean Wood, Clearfield Resident: "I guess you don't think to look at your money to see what it is."

We bumped into Marjean Wood while we were interviewing workers. She said just a few months ago she got a fake 20-dollar bill. Now, she tries to check before leaving.

Marjean Wood, Clearfield Resident: "It's sad when it used to be a handshake, and that's all you had to worry about, and now, it's not that anymore."

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