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New exhibit honors pioneer spirit

By Sam Penrod | Posted - Jul. 23, 2010 at 4:12 p.m.


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AMERICAN FORK -- As Pioneer Day approaches, Utahns remember the early settlers to our state.

The Daughters of the Utah Pioneers (DUP) in American Fork unveiled a new exhibit Friday afternoon, honoring the pioneers.

This month marks 50 years since the DUP museum opened in American Fork. Friday, two pioneer cabins, which are now part of the museum, were officially opened.

What is the International Society Daughters of Utah Pioneers?
The ISDUP was organized solely for historical, educational, and public purposes and is completely non-political and non-sectarian. The group is dedicated to honoring the names and achievements of the men, women, and children who founded Utah. It seeks to encompass a broad scope of services, ranging from the preservation of historic landmarks to the education of thousands of school children and adults about their pioneer forebears.

"We need to remember our ancestors and our heritage," says Robert Hall, who is a great-grandson of Alexander Adamson, the owner of the cabins. "It's an important part of our life. We are our heritage."

Hall cut the ribbon for the exhibit of the cabins. One was built back in 1867, the other in 1880.

Hall and others have spent the past four years saving the two cabins, moving them to the park, then restoring them using tools similar to what the pioneers had.

American Fork DUP Relic Hall
50 South 100 East
American Fork, UT
Open June-Aug., Mon. and Fri. 1:00-5:00
or by appointment; free admission
801-785-9204

The cabins have now been furnished with items, which represent the era in which the homes were occupied. The cabins will now offer people a glimpse of how the pioneers lived in the early years of the Utah territory.

"We were able to save this one and have it moved down and spent a lot of hours and got a lot of contributions to restore them," Hall says.

Inside the DUP museum, there are many artifacts which have been preserved and tell the story of pioneers who settled Utah County. The history is what the volunteers say they love to share with visitors.

The museum and cabins are located next to the American Fork City Library. They will stay open Friday night until 9:00. There's no charge to visit and a short program is also planned for 7 p.m.

E-mail: spenrod@ksl.com

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