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Injured Great Blue Heron Found By Draper Kids

Injured Great Blue Heron Found By Draper Kids


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Alex Cabrero reporting Many of us have a soft spot for injured animals, especially when it looks like they'll never be the same again.

A Great Blue Heron was found by some children in Draper yesterday. It's a good thing, because it had been there awhile and it was severely injured.

Critter Control took it from there.

"It’s okay."

Caleb Stroh has dealt with all kinds of animals. But a Great Blue Heron…

"Whoa!"

...is something brand new to him.

Caleb Stroh, Critter Control: "I was pretty scared the little guy wasn't going to make it."

Stroh owns Critter Control, an animal removal service. The big bird needed some big help.

Caleb Stroh, Critter Control: "He appears to have a broken wing. You can see it dangling there a little bit. Some other little lacerations here and there."

Fortunately, some children in Draper found it in time and Stroh picked it up in time. Stroh knew the bird needed professional help, so he rushed it to the Ogden Nature Center where workers were waiting to figure out what was wrong.

DaLyn Erickson: "The fact we can't get movement here is not a good sign."

DaLyn Erickson, a wildlife specialist, thinks the bird has been like this for at least a week, probably more.

DaLyn Erickson: "I would highly doubt this bird is gonna fly again."

To find out how bad the bird was injured, they decided to have its wing x-rayed. That way they know for sure what they're dealing with. A vet took three X-Rays, comparing its good wing to its bad wing.

Bird bones heal fast, and it appears they fused back together in a way that's not right.

DaLyn Erickson, Ogden Nature Center: "It's sad. It's really sad. These guys are a majestic, beautiful bird."

The bird will live, and will get a great place to stay, but flying in the wild most likely will never happen again.

Caleb Stroh, Critter Control: "With critters, you just never say never. That's for sure."

The bird was taken to an animal surgeon who may be able to fix the wing.

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