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Food bank director says corporate food drives offer way to donate safely

Food bank director says corporate food drives offer way to donate safely

(Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images)



PROVO — Utah’s giving spirit hasn’t gone away in the pandemic. COVID-19 has, however, made it harder to hold food drives.

Karen McCandless, executive director of Community Action Services and Food Bank in Provo, says COVID-19 canceled two of their big food drives this year. In 2019, those two events alone added 188,000 pounds of food to the food bank.

Now, with the holidays approaching, CASFB is gearing up for what McCandless says is a usual 25% increase in demand for food.

McCandless knows traditional holiday food drives, which involve mass drop-offs at a singular place, are out this year. But she thinks a corporate twist on the tradition could take their place.

How business food drives can help bridge the gap

When McCandless says “corporate,” she means all businesses big or small.

“A business-led food drive where employees are competing against each other to drive up donations can be very effective. And there is no need for a massive drop off point (which could spread infection.) Food can be quarantined for a few days before (we pick it up,)” McCandless said.

She says the food bank quarantines all donated food before it’s sorted and distributed.

McCandless says to learn more about how to host a food or fund drive, visit CASFB’s website. Also, see Tips for Food Drive Success for more helpful details.

Todd Fooks

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