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Make Your Week: Paying for groceries, buying a stranded stranger's gas

Make Your Week: Paying for groceries, buying a stranded stranger's gas

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SALT LAKE CITY — There is a lot of good in the world.

If you are feeling down and need some help seeing the silver lining today, we have your pick-me-up.

The KSL.com “Make Your Week” column features uplifting stories sent in from people outside the newsroom. To send in the stories that have made your day better, email them in 100 words or less to fjolley@ksl.com. Photos and videos are encouraged.

Getting gas for a stranger

Anonymous

“I was in a Walmart parking lot when a young lady and her son came running over and asked if I had some money for gas — her dad had just got in a truck accident and was in Salt Lake hospital. She ran out of gas on the freeway trying to get to him. All I had was a card, no cash and I tried to calm her and her child. A van pulled up and a mom and her older daughter said, ‘Can we help you?’ The mom and daughter went into Walmart, bought a gas can, went across the street, filled it, gave this young mom $20 and the gas can full of fuel, and then left.

“I want them to know this was one of the most wonderful acts of kindness I have ever witnessed.”

Paying for other people's groceries

Matrim C.

“Somebody at the local grocery store left a pile of money in one of the checkout lines to be used for each person that went through last Christmas. I definitely didn't need somebody to buy my soda and pizza, but I was still floored by the kindness of it.”

Paying it forward in the checkout line

Elle P.

“I once was in line to buy only a roll of cookie dough. A kind gentleman ahead of me saw that I only had one item, so he told me I could go ahead of him since he had a cart full of groceries. The lady ahead of me was fixin' to pay for her groceries and grabbed my cookie dough off the conveyor and told the cashier to ring them up with hers. I repaid her with a grateful thank you and hug.

“A few months later, I paid it forward when a young man in line ahead of me had only a few vegetables on the conveyor. As he was fixin' to pay for them, I told the cashier to add my groceries to his (and slyly flashed her my debit card to let her know I was paying for it all.) He looked at how many groceries I had and got a shocked look on his face and insisted to the cashier that he only had the three items. I finally told him that I was paying for his and mine.

“The look on his face was priceless and he asked, ‘But why? You don't even know me.’ I told him that once, someone who did not know me, paid for my items and now I was paying it forward by paying for his. He thanked and hugged me and the cashier was in tears. Receiving an unexpected gift from a stranger feels awesome but giving a unexpected gift to a stranger it is even more awesome!”

Helping kids get healthy

Ingrid B.

“My husband works for a local school district and is a 41-year veteran educator who has been a teacher, coach, principal and administrator. Currently he is the administrator for special programs at his school district after retiring as principal. One of the programs he oversees deals with disabled kids.

“As an old athlete and coach it bothered him that the special needs kids were not engaged in more physical activity at school and he set out to change this in his program. He partnered with Apple for a group discount to buy each of these kids a Fitbit. He got the funding through the school district and ordered about 70 Fitbits. The program is currently being implemented with very positive results. Many of the kids are very proud of the amount of steps they have taken in a day and the teachers have been assigned a technical support staff member who helps track and charge the devices. This has been very exciting for the family members who often struggle to motivate these kids to stay healthy. Feels like a win-win for all around.”

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