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What’s on the ballot? A look at amendments and propositions on Utah ballots

What’s on the ballot? A look at amendments and propositions on Utah ballots

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SALT LAKE CITY — There is now less than a month until the general election and while most of the focus is on the candidates, and rightfully so, there are topics Utahns will be asked to vote on as well.

For example, there are three amendments to the Utah Constitution on the ballot this November. All three of those will be decided on based on “for or against,” and each were passed by the Utah Senate and Utah House of Representatives earlier this year.

Those amendments are:

Utah Constitutional Amendment A

Ballot title: For or against

Legislative vote: 24 yes, 1 no in Utah Senate; 69 yes, 6 no in Utah House of Representatives

Date to take effect if approved: Jan. 1, 2017

The amendment makes a technical change to the wording of the oath which appointed state and local officials take when they are sworn into office. The change would switch the term “the Constitution of this State” to “the Constitution of the State of Utah.” The change would not affect the meaning of the oath.

Utah Constitutional Amendment B

Ballot title: For or against

Legislative vote: 26 yes, 1 no in Utah Senate; 72 yes, 0 no in Utah House of Representatives

Date to take effect if approved: July 1, 2017

This amendment makes three adjustments to the State School Fund. It changes the description of what can be distributed from the State School Fund from “interest and dividends” to “earnings.” It also limits the amount of money that can be distributed from the fund to 4 percent of the fund and changes the standard for how the state is required to invest the fund from “safely” to “prudently.” The changes are technical and would not affect the current Utah Constitution.

Utah Constitutional Amendment C

Ballot title: For or against

Legislative vote: 26 yes, 0 no in Utah Senate; 61 yes, 10 no in Utah House of Representatives

Date to take effect if approved: Jan. 1, 2017

This amendment authorizes the creation of a property tax exemption for “tangible personal property” such as machinery, office furniture or equipment that is leased by the state or by a political subdivision of the state.

*Note: All information from elections.utah.gov

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Click here for more information regarding all three Utah Constitutional amendments, as well as all political candidates and judges in the 2016 general election.

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County Propositions:

Cache County: County Proposition 11

This proposition asks Cache County residents if a Cache Water District should be created. More information, including an argument for or against the proposition can be found here.

Emery County: Proposition 1

*No information regarding this proposition was made available.

Grand County: Proposition 3

This proposition asks Grand County residents if the county should impose a health care facilities sales and use tax up to 1/2 of 1 percent to be used to help fund operations of Canyonlands Care Center and to help fund Grand County Emergency Medical Services. More information regarding the proposition, including arguments for and against, can be found here.

Grand County: Proposition 4

*No information regarding this proposition was made available.

Millard County: Proposition 1

The proposition asks if Millard County should be authorized to impose a 0.25 percent sales and use tax for the purpose of improvements to transportation, such as roads, trails, sidewalks, maintenance, and traffic and pedestrian safety, with revenues divided among the county, cities and towns, within the county. More information about the proposition can be found here.

Salt Lake County: Proposition A

This proposition asks if Salt Lake County should be authorized to issue General Obligation Bonds in any amount not exceeding $90 million for the purpose of paying all or a portion of the costs of acquiring, construction, renovating and equipping the county’s parks and recreation facilities. More information about the proposition can be found here.

Summit County: Proposition 9 and 10

Both propositions are about transit in Summit County and each represents increasing sales tax by 0.25 percent. Proposition 9 asks Summit County residents if they are for or against transit expansion, including expanding Park City to Salt Lake City Connect service, creating a Kimball Junction circulator, adding a new Kamas to Park City and Express bus route and creating new remote park and ride lots.

Proposition 10 asks residents if they are for or against road improvements, including enhancements of state Route 224 and Route 248 and more.

Click here for more information regarding both propositions.

Wasatch County: Proposition 12

*No information regarding this proposition was made available.

Washington County: Proposition 1

This proposition asks if Washington County should take 1/4 of 1 percent sales tax for transportation. Click here for more information and arguments for and against the proposition.

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Click here for a complete look at what will be on your ballot per voter location throughout the state.

As a reminder, the general election is Nov. 8. For those still looking to register to vote, the mail-in registration deadline is Tuesday, but Utah residents have until Nov. 1 to register either online or in-person. For more information on how to register, click here.

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Carter Williams

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