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Logan Residents Can Make Electricity and Share It, Too

Logan Residents Can Make Electricity and Share It, Too



Estimated read time: 1-2 minutes

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LOGAN, Utah (AP) -- The city-run utility soon could be buying electricity from its customers.

The Municipal Council has approved a metering system and rate schedule capable of measuring energy flows at properties generating their own power.

The system would allow residents to sell excess solar or wind energy to the utility and reduce strains on Logan Light & Power during peak times. "It will be a benefit, if we get a fair amount of participation, to offset that summer peaking power that we have to purchase," Light & Power Director Jay Larsen said.

Although only one Logan resident collects enough power through alternative means to sell it back to the city, officials believe that will change.

Generators powered by the sun or wind can cost between $10,000 to $30,000, depending on size. The city plans to pay for the $285 meters needed to read the systems. Regular meters cost about $65.

The system will allow Logan Light & Power to purchase excess energy generated by customers who produce more energy during daylight hours than they use.

If the excess energy is more than what customers use during a billing period, the kilowatts can be credited to future bills and carried for up to 12 months.

The utility plans to buy accumulated energy each year from residents at the current average cost of wholesale energy.

The program is available on a first-come, first-served basis to customers who have generators producing energy from solar, wind, water or biomass sources.

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Information from: The Herald Journal

(Copyright 2007 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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