Water Watchers Put Out Conservation Message

Water Watchers Put Out Conservation Message


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John Daley reportingThe cool wet days of spring are apparently behind us. Temperatures are expected to climb this week, which will greatly reduce mountain snowpack. With a hot summer ahead, water watchers are once again putting out the call for conservation.

If you take a look at the newly-planted garden on the east side of the City and County building, the message is clear. There is plenty we can all do to save water, and it can still be beautiful.

From the City and County Building, to neighborhoods all over the state, residents are switching to a water wise landscape.

Those voluntary measures are one reason last year Salt Lake's outdoor water use was 17% less than what was projected, according to the city's water conservation coordinator.

Stephanie Duer Water Conservation Coordinator "PEOPLE CAN DO SO MUCH TO SAVE WATER AND IT'S SO SIMPLE TO SAVE WATER."

Indeed--Salt Lake residents saved enough water last winter that the voluntary goal for this summer is less than might be expected: 20%. Water watchdogs say there are two great ways to save.

ONE: using less water on your lawn.

Make sure your irrigation system working right, check each sprinkler head. Water just your lawn's brown spots, only when needed. And, if you have a timer, adjust it every month. Lawns with timers use 40% more water than those without.

Each month has specific water needs. In May--water once every 4 to 7 days. June--every 3 to 4 days. July and August--every 3 days. Scale back in September--once every 7 days.

"MOST PEOPLE OVERWATER. THEY OVERWATER BETWEEN 20 AND 50 PERCENT, AND IF WE CAN STOP THAT OVERWATERING, THEN THAT'S AN INCREDIBLE STEP TOWARDS GAINING OUR CONSERVATION GOAL FOR THE LONGTERM."

Also, think about creating a sustainable water-wise landscape. Consider a step-by-step approach where you convert part of your yard each year, and place new plants according to light and water needs. Remember, whether lawn or water wise landscape, the big culprit is over watering.

"YOU CAN CHANGE YOUR LANDSCAPE, BUT UNLESS YOU CHANGE YOUR WATER PATTERN YOU'RE NOT GOING TO SAVE A DROP OF WATER. IT'S AS SIMPLE AS YOU TURNING OFF THE SPIGOT."

You can also switch to buffalo grass. This grass uses 1/10th the water of Kentucky bluegrass.

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