News / Utah / 
Some Workplaces becoming "Jungles"

Some Workplaces becoming "Jungles"

Posted - Jun. 12, 2003 at 5:22 p.m.



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

Ed Yeates reporting What began as one or two plants in the workplace is now blossoming into plants by the dozens, even more.

That's because studies are now backing up claims that plants may in fact produce a healthier work environment.

As we all know, it's a jungle outside, but now it's a jungle inside. But in this case, the employees like it.

That's because this jungle inside "The Bridge" building just makes them feel better. Researchers say those feelings may be more than just psychological.

BRANDY BALKEN, CACTUS & TROPICALS: "WHAT IT DOES IS INCREASE THE OXYGEN LEVEL, INCREASES HUMIDITY THROUGH TRANSPIRATION OF THE PLANTS, AND REALLY REMOVES A LOT OF THE TOXIC MATERIALS THAT YOU GET THROUGH YOUR CARPETING, YOUR PAINTING, YOUR LAMINENTS, ETC."

NASA researchers found indoor plants, depending on the number, remove at least three indoor pollutants: Trichloroethylene, Benzene and Formaldehyde.

Cactus and Tropicals is one of several companies feeding off the research, planting plants and maintaining them now for close to 500 corporate clients.

Kurt Larsen at Resource Management believes plants had a lot to do with leasing office space in his building.

KURT LARSEN, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: "PEOPLE SOMETIMES MAKE BUSINESS DECISIONS EMOTIONALLY AND I THINK IT MADE A BIG DIFFERENCE. IT MEANT WE PUT IN A GREAT FIRM IN A THIRD OF OUR BUILDING IN A VERY TOUGH MARKET."

More comfort, cleaner air. Joe Hiller says he chose to lease space amidst this jungle because his body just told him it was the right thing to do.

JOE HILLER, CAFE OWNER: "THE OUSTIDE OF THE BUILDING IS REALLY NON-DESCRIPT. I MEAN IT'S JUST THREE SIDES AND IT'S ALL GLASS AND UHHH, IT REALLY DOESN'T TURN ME ON. BUT WHEN WE CAME INTO THIS BUILDING, I FELT VERY MUCH WANTING TO BE HERE."

And there's more. A Washington State University study now shows an employee's exposure to plants produced significant recovery from stress, within five minutes.

SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

KSL Weather Forecast