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Agreement Reached on 12-Year Old Parker Jensen Case

Agreement Reached on 12-Year Old Parker Jensen Case

Posted - Sep. 5, 2003 at 5:09 p.m.



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Sandra Yi reporting The Jensen case gained nationwide attention after the family fled Utah to avoid chemotherapy treatments for their son. Now 12 - year old Parker's fate is in the hands of an independent doctor.

The agreement, reached in third district juvenile court late this afternoon, marks the possible end to a fierce and emotional battle between the Jensen family and the state.

Their compromise... all in the best interest of the child.

Richard Anderson, Director, DCFS: "THE NEGOTIATIONS REALLY WENT WELL. EVERY PARTY THAT WAS THERE WAS WORKING VERY HARD FOR PARKER'S BEST INTEREST AND WORKED WELL TOGETHER TO COME UP WITH THIS AGREEMENT."

A successful compromise is reached in juvenile court today. The Jensens have agreed to allow an independent pediatric oncologist to diagnose Parker and if needed, recommend treatment. The family participated in today's hearing by telephone but soon after, talked to the media from a relative's home in Idaho.

Barbara Jensen, Parker's Mother: "THIS IS PARKER'S FUTURE...THROW IT ALL AWAY."

12 - year old Parker had a tumor removed from under his mouth in June. Three hospitals confirmed Ewings sarcoma, a rare and deadly cancer. Parker's parents took him out of Utah last month, after a court ordered the boy to begin chemotherapy. The Jensen's attorney says the family only wanted what was best for Parker. He says it was never their intention, to go to court.

Blake Nakamura, Jensen's Attorney: "THEIR JOURNEY HAS NOT BEEN AN OBJECTION TO CHEMO. THEY WANTED TO GO THROUGH THE MEDICAL PROCESS TO COME TO A GOOD UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT HIS CONDITION WAS AND WHAT THE STANDARD CARE WAS FOR THAT CONDITION."

Parker will go to an undisclosed out of state hospital and undergo a series of tests, as early as next week. His parents told the judge today, if those tests show Parker does have cancer, they will follow the recommended treatment, even if that is chemotherapy.

The court agreed to drop custody warrants, but the court appointed guardian said today, if the Jensens fail to follow through with the agreement, she will regain state custody of Parker.

Daren and Barbara Jensen still face felony kidnapping charges. Their attorney says they will come back to Utah to address those charges. Whether those charges will be dropped is unknown.

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