News / Utah / 

Utahn No Rookie in Planning Big Events

Utahn No Rookie in Planning Big Events



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

Nadine Wimmer Reporting When you see big events, like a Presidential inauguration, Utahn Ron Fox is often involved. He's worked for every Republican administration since Nixon, and gives double meaning to the words Party Planner.

When the world watched Salt Lake City during the Olympics, at events with President Bush, heads of state and cabinet members, a watchful eye helped create lasting images.

Ron Fox, White House Advance Planner: “It is that defining moment when someone marries themselves to that particular speaker or that moment in history."

From Utah's moving 9/11 ceremony to presidential inaugurations, inaugurations for Utah's governors, or visits from religious and political leaders, Ron Fox has assisted the White House Advance office for several republican administrations. He works to make the President look good.

The cannons must fire and balloons drop on cue. He oversees protocol, guest lists -- even who gets to ride in the Presidential limo.

Ron Fox: “As in all events, some things happen that you don't plan. Some go well, so don't. I'm still apologetic to the mayor of Salt Lake City because the mayor of Beijing and his delegation took his seat. And he tried to get a hold of me, but Mayor Anderson was without a seat."

As a party faithful, he's orchestrated and even taken part in some historic events. If there's one memento that means the most it's this. The pen that he used as a member of the Electoral College to vote for George W. Bush. Memorable, not just because he got to actually vote for the President, but if you remember, that election came down to one vote.

Ron Fox: "Only twice in the history of the United States has it been that close."

And this is all he asks in return -- an invitation to the White House Christmas Party. He serves the administration, he says, for the privilege of taking part in history.

SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

KSL Weather Forecast