Microsoft looks to detect sex predators in video game chats

Microsoft looks to detect sex predators in video game chats


1 photo

This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

REDMOND, Wash. (AP) — Microsoft says it has developed a technique to detect online predators who try to groom children for sexual purposes using the chat function in multiplayer video games.

The tech company, which makes the Xbox gaming system, announced Thursday that it's sharing the tool with nonprofit organizations and other gaming and messaging service developers.

Nicknamed “Project Artemis,” the tool automatically scans text-based conversations and rates them on the probability that a user might be trying sexually exploit children. Human moderators are then able to review flagged conversations to determine if they should report them to law enforcement.

An engineering team led by Dartmouth College digital forensics expert Hany Farid developed the technique. Microsoft worked with Farid and the makers of messaging services like Kik and the popular game Roblox. It will be distributed for free starting Friday through the anti-trafficking group Thorn.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Photos

The Associated Press

    SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

    Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast