Glenn C.Silva, Fairhaven Neighborhood News, Pool, File

Woman who sent texts urging suicide gets 15 months in jail

By Denise Lavoie, Associated Press | Posted - Aug. 3, 2017 at 4:05 p.m.


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TAUNTON, Mass. (AP) — A young woman who as a teenager encouraged her suicidal boyfriend to kill himself in dozens of text messages was sentenced Thursday to 15 months in jail for involuntary manslaughter.

Michelle Carter was convicted in June by a judge who said her final instruction to Conrad Roy III caused his death. Carter was 17 when Roy, who was 18, was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning in July 2014.

Juvenile Court Judge Lawrence Moniz gave Carter, now 20, a 2 1/2-year jail sentence but said she had to serve only 15 months of that. He also sentenced her to five years of probation. He granted a defense motion that will keep Carter out of jail until her appeals in state courts are exhausted.

The judge called the case, which has garnered international attention, “a tragedy for two families.”

Carter’s lawyer, Joseph Cataldo, asked the judge to spare her any jail time and instead give her five years of probation and require her to receive mental health counseling. He said she was struggling with mental health issues — bulimia, anorexia and depression — during the time she urged Roy to kill himself.

“Miss Carter will have to live with the consequences of this for the rest of her life,” Cataldo said. “This was a horrible circumstance that she completely regrets.”

Prosecutor Maryclare Flynn called probation “just not reasonable punishment” for Carter’s role in Roy’s death. She asked the judge to send Carter to state prison for seven to 12 years.

Flynn said Carter “undertook a deliberate, well-thought-out campaign” to cause Roy’s death in a “quest for attention” and sympathy from her friends. She said after Roy’s death, Carter put on a charade as “the grieving girlfriend” for Roy’s family and friends, even though she had repeatedly pressured him to act on his suicidal thoughts.

Flynn said Carter could have stopped Roy because the two teenagers were on the phone together as Roy was going through with his suicide.

“All she had to do was say, ‘Get out of the car,’ ‘Get out of the truck,’ and none of us would be here right now,” Flynn said.

In dozens of text messages, Carter had urged Roy to follow through on his talk of taking his own life.

“The time is right and you are ready ... just do it babe,” Carter wrote in a text the day he killed himself.

The sensational trial was closely watched on social media, in part because of the insistent tone of Carter’s text messages.

“You can’t think about it. You just have to do it,” Carter wrote in one text. “You said you were gonna do it. Like I don’t get why you aren’t.”

Cataldo argued Roy was determined to kill himself and nothing Carter did could change that. He said Carter initially tried to talk Roy out of it and urged him to get professional help but eventually went along with his plan. He also argued Carter’s words amounted to free speech protected by the First Amendment.

In convicting Carter, the judge focused his ruling on Carter telling Roy to “get back in” after he climbed out of his truck and told her he was afraid. The judge said those words constituted “wanton and reckless conduct” under the manslaughter statute.

Roy’s relatives told the court they were devastated by his death. His father, Conrad Roy Jr., said it inflicted the “worst emotional pain” he has ever experienced.

“I am heartbroken,” he said.

A teenage sister, Camden Roy, recalled her 13 years with her older brother and said she’s “haunted” by the realization she’ll never see him wed or be an aunt to his children.

Carter and Roy met in Florida in 2012 while both were on vacation with their families. After that, they only met in person a handful of times. Their relationship consisted mainly of texting.

Cataldo said he’s confident Carter eventually will be vindicated. He said his appeal will be based on several grounds, including his argument Carter’s text messages and conversations with Roy amounted to free speech protected by the Constitution. He said he will also argue Carter didn’t break any laws because Massachusetts doesn’t have a law against assisting or encouraging suicide.

Suicide Prevention Resources
If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of suicide, call the suicide prevention hotline at 1-800-273-TALK.

Crisis Hotlines

  • Utah County Crisis Line: 801-226-4433
  • Salt Lake County/UNI Crisis Line: 801-587-3000
  • Wasatch Mental Health Crisis Line: 801-373-7393
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
  • Trevor Project Hotline for LGBTQ teens: 1-866-488-7386

Online resources

Warning signs of suicide

  • Talking about wanting to die
  • Looking for a way to kill oneself
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no purpose
  • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs
  • Acting anxious, agitated or recklessly
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or feeling isolated
  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
  • Displaying extreme mood swings
The more of these signs a person shows, the greater the risk. Warning signs are associated with suicide but may not be what causes a suicide. Information from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

What to do if you see warning signs of suicide

  • Do not leave the person alone
  • Remove any firearms, alcohol, drugs or sharp objects that could be used in a suicide attempt
  • Call the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255)
  • Take the person to an emergency room or seek help from a medical or mental health professional
Information from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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