News / 

Obama declares "victory"...Defense secretary expects truthful intel about war with IS... Terror in Phoenix

By The Associated Press | Posted - Sep. 10, 2015 at 6:41 p.m.



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is calling today's Senate vote to uphold the hard-fought Iran nuclear deal "a victory for diplomacy, for American national security and for the safety and security of the world." A disapproval resolution fell two votes short of the 60 needed to move forward as most Democratic and independent senators banded together against Republicans.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Ash Carter expects "unvarnished, transparent intelligence" from the military's senior intelligence corps about how the war against the Islamic State is going. That's according to spokesman Peter Cook. The Pentagon's inspector general is investigating allegations of skewed intelligence reports from the military command overseeing the war.

PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey is asking residents to be vigilant in the wake of an increasing number of freeway shootings in Phoenix. Authorities have confirmed 11 vehicles have been shot at in the Phoenix area over the last two weeks, with most of them occurring on freeways. The most recent incident occurred this morning. Authorities found a bullet hole in a truck.

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Firefighters in Central California say the state's largest wildfire is threatening to sweep through an ancient grove of Giant Sequoia trees considered to be a national treasure. The fast-moving flames are now about five miles from Grant Grove, named for the towering General Grant tree that stands 268 feet tall. There are dozens of Sequoia groves in the Sierra Nevada..

SEATTLE (AP) — Teachers in Seattle say they've walked off the job largely because they can't afford to live in the same city as the children they teach. The educators, who haven't received a cost-of-living pay raise in six years, have joined other workers pushing for higher wages that compete with the city's growing, highly paid tech workers.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Associated Press

    SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

    Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast