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Wildfires burn in California... Clinton discusses private email server ... Reports: Russia to send more help to Syria

By The Associated Press | Posted - Sep. 5, 2015 at 7:41 p.m.



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FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Half a dozen wildfires are burning throughout California, a relatively small number compared to the past two hot months that kept firefighters running. But a large wildfire in Kings Canyon National Park, east of Fresno, is expected to spew smoke throughout the Labor Day weekend, leaving roads closed and some campgrounds empty. It covers 134 square miles.

PORTSMOUTH, N.H. (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton says she encourages "anyone who is asked to cooperate" with a House panel looking into her private email use to do so. The Democratic front-runner says her family did pay a State Department employee to maintain the private email server she used while secretary of state and compensated him "for a period of time" for his technical skills.

BEIRUT (AP) — There are unconfirmed reports suggesting that Russia is planning to expand its military support for Syrian President Bashar Assad. That's prompting a warning from the U.S. that such actions could lead to a confrontation with coalition forces. The State Department says Secretary of State John Kerry has called Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov to discuss the issue.

GRAYSON, Ky. (AP) — Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is spending her third day in a Kentucky jail, because she has refused to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples despite a series of court orders. She says her religious beliefs prevent her from doing so. Several hundred people gathered outside the jail in Grayson today and hailed Davis as a Christian hero in a war against the godless.

PHOENIX (AP) — A federal judge says the challengers of Arizona's landmark immigration law have failed to show that police would enforce the statute differently for Latinos than it would for people of other ethnicities. She has upheld the law's controversial provision that police, while enforcing other laws, can question the immigration status of those suspected of being in the U.S. illegally.

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The Associated Press

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