Woman loses 110 pounds to join the Army

Woman loses 110 pounds to join the Army

(Courtesy Karyna Douglass)


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Estimated read time: 4-5 minutes

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PORTLAND, Ore. (CNN) — The phone call was short, and not at all sweet.

"Do you weigh more than 160 pounds?" the voice on the other end asked Karyna Douglas.

"Yeah, I know I do," she replied.

And that was it. Douglas' call to the local Navy recruiting center lasted less than five minutes.

"I felt horrible," she said. "I thought maybe I could change that. I didn't realize how big I actually was."

It was on a whale-watching trip to celebrate her 22nd birthday that Douglas first toyed with the idea of joining the military. She noticed her fellow passengers on the boat were really enamored with the Coast Guardsmen patrolling nearby.

At the time, Douglas was working a part-time job in Portland, Oregon. She wasn't having any luck getting student loans to go back to school and was having serious issues with her family. To deal with it, she turned to food, eating fast food during the day and binging on candy when she got home at night.

Chocolate was her drug of choice. Sometimes with a side of ice cream.

At her heaviest in 2012, Karyna Douglas weighed 
300 pounds. She often ate fast food for dinner 
and loved to binge on candy at night.
At her heaviest in 2012, Karyna Douglas weighed 300 pounds. She often ate fast food for dinner and loved to binge on candy at night. (Photo: Courtesy Karyna Douglass)

"I was realizing that the people who you thought were going to be there for you weren't at all," she said. "I felt trapped."

The 5-foot-7 22-year-old weighed 300 pounds.

After the painful phone call, Douglas started running every night around her neighborhood. A few months later she went to the Navy recruiting center in person. As she was about to enter, an Army recruiter from the next office over called out to her. It was the first time Douglas had ever seen a soldier up close.

"I just sort of stared," she said with a laugh, as the recruiter told her about their morning workout program for potential enlistees.

She dragged a friend to the first training session. They started by running laps, then moved on to push-ups. Douglas left shortly after the warm-up.

"It doesn't sound like much now, but at that point, oh my God, it made me throw up," Douglas said. The friends went to get milkshakes to make themselves feel better.


I would go months without losing weight. It was so frustrating. I remember ... just saying, 'I can't do this. I'm never going to be small enough.'

–Karyna Douglas


It was two weeks before Douglas gathered the courage to go back. No one from the Army called her. Her friend didn't push.

"I just thought, if I'm really serious I have to give it a shot," she said.

She worked out with the group every day that week, Monday through Thursday. It was hard, but she realized she could do it.

Douglas started waking up at 4 a.m. every day to take a bus to the group's morning workout. They run 2.5 to 4 miles, and then she heads to the gym before going to work. On Tuesdays and Thursdays she takes the bus back for an afternoon workout of jumping jacks, mountain climbers and push-ups.

She also overhauled her diet, cutting out fast food, fried food and soda, and limiting her candy intake. Every week she tries a new diet to keep it interesting — one week she avoids carbohydrates; another week she skips meat.

Embargo: Portland, OR. Karyna Douglass is on a 
mission. She dreamed of joining the army, but 
when she found out she didn't meet the weight 
requirements she decided to lose 100 pounds.
Embargo: Portland, OR. Karyna Douglass is on a mission. She dreamed of joining the army, but when she found out she didn't meet the weight requirements she decided to lose 100 pounds. (Photo: Karyna Douglass/KPTV)

A year and three months later, Douglas has lost 110 pounds. She was sworn into the Army on December 12.

"I fell in love with their world," Douglas told CNN affiliate KPTV. "I fell in love with the bonds that I created with these people. I fell in love for what they stand for."

It wasn't always easy. There were days when she would call Sgt. Cody Baker, the Future Soldier Leader, and quit.

"I would go months without losing weight. It was so frustrating," she said. "I remember ... just saying, 'I can't do this. I'm never going to be small enough.'"

But Baker never gave up on her. Neither did Douglas' friends and roommates, who encouraged her to stay on track.

Today, Douglas is "literally a walking Army billboard." Her clothes, her room and her accessories are all advertisements for her new family. She's looking forward to basic training, and plans to drop another 20 pounds.

Her advice to others who want to lose weight? Lie to yourself.

"You love this feeling. You love being tired. You love being sore. Because in the end, you will."

The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2013 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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