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Fireworks market blast...Looking for a suspect in Germany...Gender-neutral title adjustment scrapped



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TULTEPEC, Mexico (AP) — A powerful chain-reaction blast at a well-known fireworks market in Mexico City has killed at least 29 people and injured more than 70 others. A woman who came out of the explosion unscathed says she took off running when the thunderous explosions began. Crescencia Garcia says "everything was catching fire. Everything was exploding" and "everything was flying."

BERLIN (AP) — German security forces are still hunting for whoever was behind the wheel of a truck that tore through a Christmas market Monday, killing a dozen people and hurting about 50 more. Berlin's police chief is warning people to be particularly vigilant because the attacker may still be on the loose. A Pakistani man was questioned in connection with the truck-ramming but was released for lack of evidence. The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for the attack.

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — A Turkish government official is characterizing yesterday's assassination of the Russian ambassador to the country as bearing the marks of being "fully professional" and "not a one-man action." Investigators are trying to figure out whether others had helped plan the killing. Multiple people close to the shooter have been detained.

BOSTON (AP) — A judge in Massachusetts has ruled two men facing multiple murder charges in a deadly meningitis outbreak will be tried separately. The judge says there's an imbalance of evidence against the two former New England Compounding Center officials and that their lawyers plan to use different defenses. Tainted steroid injections from the center killed 64 people nationwide.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Navy is scrapping a decision to eliminate dozens of enlisted sailors' job titles, many of which end in "man." The move comes after thousands of sailors expressed anger over the decision to drop the long-held traditional titles. Naval officials say they modernized the titles in the hope that by making them more understandable to the civilian world, it would help sailors more easily get jobs once they left the service. The review of the titles was launched shortly after the Pentagon's January order that all combat jobs be open to women.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Associated Press

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