News / 

Landscape Design Classes

Landscape Design Classes



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

Larry A. Sagers Regional Horticultural Specialist Utah State University Extension Service Thanksgiving Point Office © All Rights Reserved

Basic Landscape Design October 5,12,19 and 26 from 10:00 AM- Noon with Larry Sagers

Whether you're designing a first-time landscape or remodeling an existing landscape, learn the steps for creating a look that you will enjoy. the class covers creating focal points, entryways, how to frame your home or preserve a view and water-wise landscape. There will be a 15 minute individual consultation on the last day with a USU Extension Service Master Gardener.

Register for program sections online or call the Institute at 801-768-4971 or toll-free 1-888-672-6040 (select Education option) to register.

Fall is an ideal time to plants trees for several reasons. At the top of his list is his utilization of labor. Think of how busy you are trying to get everything done in your own home garden in the spring and get to work now.

The second reason is that the plants adapt better in the fall. In the spring, the newly planted trees are exposed to increasing temperatures. This means that they have to get their roots well established and start to absorb water before the temperatures get warm. In addition, the new tender leaves that are emerging in the spring are very susceptible to scorch. If we have premature hot weather in the spring, it puts trees under extreme stress.

Soil moisture is another factor. The spring weather is often unpredictable and the soil is usually wet. That makes it hard to prepare and hard to plant. By contrast, the soil in the fall is usually dry and the temperatures are warm.

Soil temperature is another important factor. Trees roots continue to grow and expand anytime the soil is not frozen. Fall planted trees have several months to establish their roots in the fall. They can adapt to their environment before they are exposed to hot temperatures. In addition, the trees fall planted trees have mature leaves that are less likely to scorch.

Avoid planting bare root trees in the fall in Utah. No local nurseries sell bare root trees at this time of the year, but occasionally mail-order nurseries mistakenly send them to our area. If you order plants by the mail, request all bare root stock come in the spring.

Local nurseries have ball and burlap or container grown trees available. Ball and burlap plants are field grown and are root pruned so the root systems are compact and fibrous. They are dug and the root balls are enclosed in burlap. This method is popular for plants that do not loose their foliage such as conifers and broadleaved evergreens and larger field grown deciduous trees.

When selecting balled and burlap plants, be sure the ball is round and has not been broken. Avoid plants that feel loose in the soil. Be sure the soil ball has not dried out.

Container grown plants are also very popular. These are easy to transplant but may develop the most problems. Carefully remove the pot and inspect the root balls carefully. Avoid badly pot bound plants where you see the roots circling on top of the soil surface.

After the plants are removed from the containers, cut down the sides of the root ball to remove encircling roots that will later strangle the plants. The cuts need not be deep but they must sever any roots that are likely to encircle the plants.

The final reason for fall planting is that many nurseries do not want to overwinter the stock and offer some excellent bargains. Shop carefully and look for quality. Select plants that are free of insects and diseases or obvious mechanical damage.

Never plant the trees too deep. Plant the plant at the same depth it was in the original nursery. Planting them too deep almost guarantees the trees will die. The other problem is string trimmers. These destroy hundreds and hundreds of trees each year. Keep them away from the trees or the trees will be girdled and die.

SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

KSL Weather Forecast