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The Nation's Weather



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A cold frontal boundary will stretch from the Pacific Northwest to the northern Plains on Wednesday. An area of low pressure along the eastern end of the frontal boundary will usher a mixture of rain and snow across the central third of the country. A swath of heavy snow is expected over Minnesota, Wisconsin and the western Great Lakes, while a mixture of heavy rain and snow will develop across the central Plains and the Middle Mississippi Valley. Meanwhile, an onshore flow from the Pacific will bring unsettled weather to the Pacific Northwest. Rainy conditions can be expected over Washington and Oregon, while high elevation snow showers will move across the Cascades and the northern Rockies. A separate cold front will extend from Nevada to Colorado, providing a mixture of rain and snow to the central Rockies. The Desert Southwest will stay mostly clear of precipitation on Wednesday.

The majority of the East Coast will experience cold, sunny conditions as a ridge of high pressure builds over the Mid-Atlantic. Early morning snow will be possible across northeastern New England, while early morning showers will linger over parts of Florida.

TUESDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................95 Death Valley, Calif.

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................101 Kendall, Fla.

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................-7 Land O Lakes, Wis.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-7 Baudette, Minn.

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................72 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................3.86 Tallahassee, Fla.

ON THIS DATE

Oklahoma experienced damaging weather on this date in 1990. Along with strong winds, large baseball size hail fell near Carney, OK. Unfortunately, many near deadline tax returns were blown away from a mail cart by reported wind gusts of 100 mph in Oklahoma City.

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The Associated Press

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