News / 

The Nation's Weather



Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

A strong cold front will stretch from southern Texas to the central Great Lakes. This system will push a cold air mass southward across the central third of the country. As this system interacts with a warm, muggy air mass surging northward from the Gulf of Mexico, numerous showers and thunderstorms will develop across a handful of states. During the first half of the day, stormy weather will push across the Mississippi Valley, the western Gulf Coast, the Tennessee Valley, the upper Midwest and the Ohio Valley. During the afternoon and evening, thunderstorms will shift eastward over portions of the Southeast and the eastern Great Lakes. Severe thunderstorms will be possible across the central Gulf Coast, especially over eastern Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama.

Meanwhile, a low pressure system is forecast to develop over the central Plains, just east of the central Rockies. Due to a cold air mass across the region, a mixture of rain and snow is expected over Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. Light snow showers will also move across the northern Plains on Monday.

High pressure over the eastern Pacific will keep conditions mostly clear over the western third of the country. Temperatures are forecast to range between the 80s and 90s across the Desert Southwest.

SUNDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................100 Death Valley, Calif.

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................96 Laredo, Texas

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................3 St Mary, Mont.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-28 Barrow, Alaska

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................67 Santa Fe, N.M.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................2.80 Monticello, Iowa

ON THIS DATE

Dubbed "The Black Blizzard", the most notorious dust storm of the dust bowl era struck the Plains on this date in 1935. Clouds of dust were visible from Atlantic Ocean shipping lanes and huge, black dust clouds were seen over Washington, D.C. The fine dust was created by farming techniques of the era and was easily made airborne by wind. By the fall of 1938, rain would bring an end to the Dust Bowl era.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Associated Press

    SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

    Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast