Extreme heat continues to hit the nation with nearly 90 million Americans under a heat advisory

Nicole Brown wipes sweat from her face while setting up her beverage stand near the National Mall on July 22, in Washington. Nearly 90 million Americans are under a heat advisory, with heat building up in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast this week.

Nicole Brown wipes sweat from her face while setting up her beverage stand near the National Mall on July 22, in Washington. Nearly 90 million Americans are under a heat advisory, with heat building up in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast this week. (Nathan Howard, Associated Press)



Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

WASHINGTON — Nearly 90 million Americans are under a heat advisory while more than 100 million have experienced extreme heat alerts for eight out of the last 16 days.

As many as 54.7 million Americans will be in areas with dangerous heat levels on Thursday, meaning temperatures from 103 to 124 degrees where heat cramps or exhaustion is likely.

According to CBS News, more than 80% of Americans will experience heat above 90 degrees in the next week with the heat building up in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. On Thursday, Boston Mayor Michelle Wu declared a heat emergency that will last through Sunday.

In Oregon, officials have reported at least seven heat-related deaths, according to the Associated Press, during a heatwave in the Pacific Northwest last week when the region saw triple-digit temperatures.

So far this summer, Utah has seen 21 days in the triple digits — 18 of those being in July — and was the hottest July on record, according to KSL-TV meteorologist Matthew Johnson.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's prediction for August shows hotter-than-average temperatures for most of the country, though parts of the Southwest may see cooler-than-average temperatures and wetter weather.

How can you protect yourself from the heat? The CDC provides a few recommendations for how to deal with the scorching summer temperatures.

  • Stay in an air conditioned, indoor location as much as you can. Salt Lake County has designated "cool zones" in public libraries, recreation centers and senior centers available for residents.
  • Drink plenty of fluids even if you don't feel thirsty.
  • Schedule outdoor activities carefully. Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing and sunscreen. Remember to pace yourself.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.
  • Never leave children or pets in cars.

Check the local news for health and safety updates.

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Carlene Coombs

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