News / 

Latest Wyoming news, sports, business and entertainment at 9:20 p.m. MST



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

ELK REFUGE-DISEASE

New lawsuit over Wyoming elk feeding seeks sooner phase-out

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Environmental groups have filed a new lawsuit against the feeding of elk on a Wyoming wildlife refuge. The Sierra Club, National Wildlife Refuge Association and Defenders of Wildlife sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2019, alleging that giving alfalfa to elk to help them survive winters on the National Wildlife Refuge can encourage the spread of disease. The groups allege in a new lawsuit against the service Monday that a recently released plan to reduce feeding won't take effect soon enough. Fish and Wildlife Service officials didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

ROCKIES WEATHER

Snow storm hits Rockies, closing schools, delaying flights

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A major snowstorm throughout the Rockies region overnight has closed schools and stretches of highways in Wyoming and Utah and delayed flights in Salt Lake City. The National Weather Service says 18 inches was on the ground in parts of the greater Salt Lake City area Monday morning. And more is expected. The Salt Lake City International Airport reported flight delays up to 90 minutes and experts say nearly 9 inches of snow that fell there broke a 1936 record for the day. Heavy snow closed long stretches of Interstates 80 and 25 and other roads across central Wyoming. The storm also closed some Wyoming schools and a small Casper airport.

COAL BANKRUPTCIES-PAY

Measures to help Wyoming coal workers recover pay move ahead

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — A Wyoming legislative committee has endorsed two measures to help workers recover wages from bankrupt coal companies but not one that would allow the state to sue on their behalf. One bill endorsed by a select legislative committee on coal bankruptcies Thursday would protect workers who file wage claims from employer retaliation, like not being hired back after furloughs. Another bill moving ahead would allow state attorneys to investigate a bankrupt company’s wage or hour records. The Casper Star-Tribune reports the committee declined to support legislation that would allow the state to sue on behalf of employees with wage claims.

ANIMAL CRUELTY-ACQUITTAL

Wyoming father and son acquitted of animal cruelty charges

GILLETTE, Wyo. (AP) — A Wyoming father and son who were charged with animal cruelty on their property have been acquitted. The Gillette News Record reported David Love and his son, Trenton Love, were found not guilty Friday on 27 counts each of animal cruelty. They were accused of not providing proper food and water for 27 of their animals in June 2019 after authorities found a pile of dead animals. David Love testified he allows cattle and horses to die of old age at the end of their rodeo careers out of love instead of taking them to a killing plant.

GAME FARM ELK-CWD

Montana game farm quarantined after positive elk CWD test

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — A Montana game farm is under quarantine after an elk tested positive for chronic wasting disease. The brain wasting disease hasn't been identified in domestic deer or elk in Montana since 1999. The testing that discovered the illness is required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Herd Certification Program. The elk appeared healthy and was slaughtered for meat. The illness was discovered in testing. Montana law requires CWD positive game farm herds to be quarantined for five years or killed and tested. State veterinarian Marty Zaluski says they'll investigate to determine the source of the infection.

WILD HORSES-CORRAL

Land use vote will affect proposed Wyoming wild horse corral

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Officials are set to make a final decision this week on a land use regulation change that would open the door to a South Dakota company building a wild horse facility in southeastern Wyoming. Laramie County commissioners are scheduled to vote Tuesday on the change that would affect any future projects that are deemed concentrated animal feeding operations, including Equine Elite's proposed facility in Burns. The Wyoming Tribune Eagle reports that the change would only require neighbors within a mile to approve of such projects _ the standard across the state _ rather than those within a 3-mile radius.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Associated Press

    SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

    Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast