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Officials: US-Russia talks on Syria useful...Japan's leader to visit Pearl harbor...Flight recorder found



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WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials say talks on the separate American and Russian fights against the Islamic state group are doing some good and dispel the notion that the ties between former Cold War foes are "frozen. The American officials say contact is improving and becoming more frequent with each side trading information even outlining some of their strategic objectives.

HONOLULU (AP) — There's a lot of symbolism today behind the visit of Japan's Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, to Pearl Harbor. Although Japanese leaders have visited Pearl Harbor before, Abe will be the first to visit the memorial that now rests on the hallowed waters above the sunken USS Arizona. The attack in December 1941 drew America into World War II. There's expected to be no apology for the attack.

SOCHI, Russia (AP) — Officials say searchers, including divers, have found fragments of the fuselage, parts of the engine and various mechanical parts, including one of the flight recorders, from the Russian plane that crashed into the Black Sea over the weekend, killing all 92 people aboard. Officials have been anxious to squelch speculation that it might have been terrorism.

CHICAGO (AP) — The blizzard has moved out but its effects remain in the northern Great Plains today. Officials say thousands remain without power in the Dakotas and Michigan. High winds and drifting snow continue to make travel hazardous in the Dakotas, even as vast stretches of highways reopened to traffic. Interstate 94 remains closed west of Jamestown, North Dakota.

BEIJING (AP) — China says it's hitting the accelerator pedal on its space industry. Beijing issued a white paper today, setting out the country's space strategy for the next five years including plans to become the first country to soft land a probe on the far side of the moon, by around 2018, and launch its first Mars probe by 2020. China says it aims to use space for peaceful purposes and to guarantee national security.

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The Associated Press

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