Architectural Nexus

Posted - Jul. 23, 2003 at 6:54 a.m.



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

This is Fred Ball for Zions Bank, speaking on business.

The word nexus comes from a Latin root meaning to join, or to connect. Recently, the architectural firms of Jensen Haslem and Thomas Petersen Hammond merged to form one company. They aptly named the new firm Architectural Nexus.

I was surprised to learn how many of the unique and memorable buildings in Utah were designed by the architects of this extraordinary firm. The company is particularly well known here in Utah for the medical and educational facilities it has designed. For example, the Huntsman Cancer Institute and the renovations and additions to Primary Children's Medical Center were designed by Architectural Nexus. So too were the Student Pavilion at Salt Lake Community College and the Val. A. Browning Library at Dixie College.

I spoke with Architectural Nexus' president, Donald Finlayson. Donald oversees a board of 11 senior partners who are all responsible, he says, for the firm's success. One of the company's strengths is the ability to work together as a team on all of its many projects.

But the architectural designs of this firm include more than just hospitals and school-related buildings. A few of the projects that have caught my eye are the Abravanel Hall Expansion, the Village at Riverwoods, the Provo City Fire Station and Rodizio Grill in Orem.

Donald told me that the people at Architectural Nexus hope that each one of their designs contribute in a positive way to the landscape and character of a community. One of their most exciting projects yet to be completed is the American West Heritage Center in Wellsville in northern Utah, which will appeal to all five of the human senses: sight, sound, touch, smell and even taste. Part of the structure will be built in the shape of a teepee, in an effort to make the general public more aware of the Shoshone Indian Nation.

For Zions Bank, I'm Fred Ball. I'm speaking on business.

SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

KSL Weather Forecast