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Signs of growth...Base security heightened...Listeria not reported?



Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Analysts say job growth in April is another sign that the economy is recovering from a harsh winter and other temporary factors that likely caused it to shrink in the first three months of the year. The Labor Department reports the economy added 223,000 jobs in April. The solid gain helped lower the unemployment rate to 5.4 percent from 5.5 percent in March, the lowest rate since May 2008, six months into the Great Recession.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. military has increased the threat level at bases across North America. That likely means more random bag or vehicle checks. The baseline level has been moved from A to B. There are four levels, A through D. The Pentagon says the increase was not triggered by a specific event, but due to a generally heightened threat environment.

PARIS (AP) — Saudi Arabia's foreign minister says a five-day cease-fire in Yemen will start on Tuesday. He says the halt in fighting will be renewable, depending on compliance by Yemen's Houthi (HOO'-thee) rebels and their allies. He urged them to cease fighting. The cease-fire is supposed to allow some desperately needed humanitarian supplies to reach millions of people who've been trapped amid the war in Yemen.

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations is calling for an impartial investigation into the way that child sexual abuse allegations against French soldiers in the Central African Republic have been handled. And the U.N. human rights chief is asking why France didn't move more quickly to pursue the claims.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration says it wasn't told listeria had been found in a Blue Bell Creameries plant before an outbreak linked to its ice cream turned deadly. Results of an FDA investigation released this week show the company had found the bacteria dating back to 2013. Companies are required to notify federal health officials if they find a "reasonable probability" that a food could make people sick.

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The Associated Press

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