New South Fla. threat: invasive rock pythons



Estimated read time: Less than a minute

This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

MIAMI (AP) - State biologists are concerned that the aggressive rock python might be the latest invasive species to become established in the Everglades and elsewhere in South Florida.

Rock pythons can grow to about 16 feet and are the largest snakes in Africa. Biologists say they are among the world's most aggressive snakes and will eat almost anything they can swallow.

Wildlife officials say they want to prevent these pythons from joining their Burmese cousins as an established, breeding species with no natural predators in Florida.

A survey conducted Friday as part of a state effort to eradicate the snakes from South Florida turned up no snakes, but officials say many could still be there.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Most recent U.S. stories

Related topics

U.S.

SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

KSL Weather Forecast