News / 

Study Looking At Using Prostate Cancer Drug to Treat Alzheimer's

Study Looking At Using Prostate Cancer Drug to Treat Alzheimer's


Save Story
Leer en español

Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

(NBC News) -- We live in a day and age where there are a growing number of options for the treatment of the mind-robbing disease known as Alzheimer's.

One of the latest being studied is one that's currently approved to treat prostate cancer.

Maria and Robert Digiuseppe have been married for 52 years. Each memory, each occasion very special to this couple.

"We just had a grandchild after 52 years."

And Maria is hoping to hold on to these cherished moments for as long as she can. You see, a few years ago, she was diagnosed with Alzheimer�s.

Robert DiGiuseppe, Husband of Alzheimer's Patient: "It's a tough ordeal."

Study Looking At Using Prostate Cancer Drug to Treat Alzheimer's

That's why this couple is willing to try a new treatment that may help slow, even stop the progression of her disease. It's currently being used to treat prostate cancer.

Dr. Stephen Salloway, Alzheimer's Researcher: "Well, they way this treatment was discovered is a patient with Alzheimer's disease who developed prostate cancer received this medicine called LUPR.. another name is Lupron. And his family noticed that the Alzheimer's disease seemed to arrest itself."

Earlier clinical trials using Lupron on Alzheimer�s patients showed it stabilized the disease, in other words, patients it didn't get any worse. But it was given in injection form.

Now they're trying another delivery method-this tiny tube loaded with the medicine. It's inserted just under the skin in the abdomen.

Dr. Stephen Salloway, Alzheimer's Researcher: "And it slowly releases over a period of eight weeks. You get a better delivery of medicine over that eight weeks than giving it by injection. When you give it by injection your blood level goes up and then it goes down and it's gone. When you give it this way, it's slow release and it's more available to the body to work so it works over a longer period of time."

The Digiuseppes are hoping this treatment works, especially Robert who's taken on a lot of the household chores.

Robert DiGiuseppe, Husband of Alzheimer's Patient: "Do the laundry, do the cooking."

Maria DiGiuseppe: "He's taken over."

Robert DiGiuseppe, Husband of Alzheimer's Patient: "She'll do anything to avoid that."

Reporter: "Ahhhh, so you have an ulterior motive."

Maria DiGiuseppe: "yes."

This study is ongoing, so it will be some time until complete results are compiled.

Most recent News stories

STAY IN THE KNOW

Get informative articles and interesting stories delivered to your inbox weekly. Subscribe to the KSL.com Trending 5.
By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

KSL Weather Forecast