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Volunteers show gratitude to frontline health care workers through HOPE Project

The COVID-19 pandemic is still very overwhelming for our frontline health care workers, so a group of volunteers came together to feed about 250 of them as a way to say thank you. (Mike Anderson, KSL-TV)



Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

BOUNTIFUL — The COVID-19 pandemic is still very overwhelming for our frontline health care workers, so a group of volunteers came together to feed about 250 of them as a way to say thank you.

Volunteers got the help of Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction to feed everyone Tuesday.

Crew members with Wadsworth Construction help feed health care workers at Lakeview Hospital in Bountiful Tuesday.
Crew members with Wadsworth Construction help feed health care workers at Lakeview Hospital in Bountiful Tuesday. (Photo: Mike Anderson, KSL-TV)

The organizer said she saw how the pandemic continues to affect those on the front line and she wanted them to know they're still appreciated.

While volunteers set up the food, Tracy Ellis worked to fill over a couple-hundred thank you bags — all to send a message.

"To our health care heroes, your sacrifices are immeasurable," said Ellis as she read a thank you note on her phone.

Some of the thank you notes written for the frontline health care workers, Tuesday, in Bountiful.
Some of the thank you notes written for the frontline health care workers, Tuesday, in Bountiful. (Photo: Mike Anderson, KSL-TV)

A heartfelt message to let frontline health care workers know that people still care.

"We know the circumstances you all face are unfair, and yet, you continue to work tirelessly," said Ellis.

"It's just hard to emotionally, mentally and physically be there, you know, and then have to come home and try not to bring it home," said Liz Barnes.

Liz Barnes is Ellis's sister-in-law, and in some way, her inspiration for this project.

"I see that this has been stressful for her and I'm glad that this means a lot to her," said Ellis. "That's the whole point, is we want it to mean a lot to all the health care workers."

Tracy Ellis (left) and her sister-in-law Liz Barnes (right) talk about how they want frontline health care workers to know they are appreciated, Tuesday in Bountiful.
Tracy Ellis (left) and her sister-in-law Liz Barnes (right) talk about how they want frontline health care workers to know they are appreciated, Tuesday in Bountiful. (Photo: Mike Anderson, KSL-TV)

All over the country, workers like Barnes put in long shifts — some, while raising families.

"It's been hard to brave these last two years for us," said Barnes.

All the while, Barnes said, their ICU remains full, with still mostly unvaccinated patients.

"It's a good three- or four-week dedication to these patients, and then, lots of times, they don't make it in the end, and so that's really hard," she said.

While health care workers saw a lot of thanks early on, it doesn't happen as often now, making events like Tuesday afternoon so important.

"For me, it's also given me HOPE," said Ellis.

That's the name of the organization — Helping Our Providers Endure.

“The HOPE Project” Facebook page.
“The HOPE Project” Facebook page. (Photo: Mike Anderson, KSL-TV)

"We will forever be indebted to you all and can't wait for the day you get to take a breath," said Ellis. "You have our unwavering support, love and adoration."

The HOPE Project continues to look for donations and volunteers as they work to take their message to more hospitals.


*KSL does not assure that the money deposited to the account will be applied for the benefit of the persons named as beneficiaries. If you are considering a deposit to the account, you should consult your own advisors and otherwise proceed at your own risk.

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Mike Anderson

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