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Agreement Filed on Superfund Cleanup

Agreement Filed on Superfund Cleanup

Posted - Sep. 13, 2004 at 7:45 a.m.



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SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- After 10 years of negotiations, the agreement on the Superfund cleanup of the old Sharon Steel site in Midvale has been filed in federal court.

A consent decree between the Environmental Protection Agency and Littleson Inc. was filed Friday.

It resolves liability issues and spells out how metals and heavy toxins at the former smelter will be removed.

The Littleson Corp. has owned the 300-acre site since 1964. It plans to use it for a development of homes, retail stores and offices to be called Bingham Landing.

Previous owners of the site already settled with the EPA, leaving cleanup funds in special accounts.

It was a lot of mental stress getting there, but in the long run it was a fair solution to the problem, Littleson Inc. owner Bob Soehnlen said Sunday.

The decree authorizes Soehnlen to use $16 million left over from the Sharon Steel mitigation fund. That fund was originally used to clean up an area south of the slag site.

A portion of Bingham Landing profits are to be paid to the federal government.

Midvale Mayor JoAnn Seghini said the agreement reached was the best possible solution for both sides.

The cleanup will protect public health and the environment but it will be done in such a way to maximize its economic development reuse, Seghini said.

In the long term, that development will have a positive impact on Midvale's economy, the mayor said.

Entact, an environmental remedies service, is expected to be hired to remove lead, arsenic and other contaminates at the site before cleaning the soil and regrading the site, said Christine Richman, Midvale community and economic development director,

The cleanup is expected to take 18 to 24 months.

(Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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