In a drought: Why are southern Utah golf courses, parks still getting watered during the day?

Sprinkler watering grass in St. George, Utah, June 4, 2015. There’s a difference between water used for lawns and gardens versus water counties and cities use to water their parks, cemeteries and golf courses.

Sprinkler watering grass in St. George, Utah, June 4, 2015. There’s a difference between water used for lawns and gardens versus water counties and cities use to water their parks, cemeteries and golf courses. (Mori Kessler, St. George News)



ST. GEORGE — While area residents have been urged to restrict their outdoor water use during the day, sprinklers can still be seen watering cemeteries, golf courses, school grounds and other large properties in the middle of a severe drought.

Is this because the county and its municipalities are callously wasting water for the sake of green grass while encouraging residents to let their own lawns turn yellow?

That's not the case at all, say county and municipal water managers.

There's actually a difference between the quality of water people use to water their lawns and gardens versus the water the county and cities use to water their parks, cemeteries and golf courses.

Drinking-grade water, also commonly referred to as culinary water or potable water, is water that has been treated to the point it is safe to drink. For residents, it's the water that comes out of their faucets, shower heads and sprinkler systems.

Irrigation-grade water, also called secondary water, isn't up to drinking standards and also may not be feasible to treat for drinking use for various reasons. This can include water taken directly from wells and streams and treated sewer water and reuse water. This water is used for agriculture watering, and is also applied to a city's parks, sports fields, golf courses and cemeteries. School grounds also use this water source.

Read the full article at St. George News.

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Mori Kessler

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