Latest Idaho news, sports, business and entertainment at 3:20 a.m. MDT

By The Associated Press | Posted - Jul. 31, 2020 at 3:20 a.m.



AP-US-RACIAL-INJUSTICE-PORTLAND

Oregon police try to tamp down nightly Portland protests

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon police took over protecting a federal courthouse in Portland that’s been a target of violent protests as local authorities try to tamp down demonstrations that have wracked the city for more than two months. Having state and local officers step up their presence was part of a deal between the Democratic governor and the Trump administration that aimed to draw down the number of U.S. agents during nightly unrest. Portland police cleared out a park Thursday across from the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse that demonstrators have used as a staging ground, while state troopers headed into downtown Portland. Portland has seen demonstrations since George Floyd died in May.

POLICE PURSUIT-SHOOTOUT-COURT

Idaho suspect in pursuit, shootout appears in court

LEWISTON, Idaho (AP) — A former participant in an armed occupation in 2016 at an Oregon wildlife refuge appeared in court this week. He had been arrested and charged with felony aggravated assault on a law enforcement officer during a shootout in northern Idaho earlier this month. The Lewiston Tribune reported that 52-year-old Sean L. Anderson appeared at his initial hearing online from the New Perce County Jail on Wednesday. The shootout occurred after an attempted traffic stop for an apparent equipment violation. Police said the pursuit ended when the vehicle stopped in a residential area and shots were fired. Anderson was injured. No officers were injured. He faces a maximum 25 years in prison if convicted.

BALLOT INITIATIVE-PANDEMIC LAWSUIT

Supreme Court halts Idaho online signatures for initiative

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The U.S Supreme Court has ruled that an Idaho group must stop collecting online signatures for an education funding initiative for the November ballot. The court on Thursday ruled in favor of Republican Gov. Brad Little's request that a district court's order allowing online signatures be stayed until the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals hears the case and makes a ruling. The Supreme Court's ruling ends for now Reclaim Idaho's attempt to collect enough signatures during the coronavirus pandemic for the initiative seeking to raise $170 million for K-12 education. It would raise Idaho’s corporate tax rate and increase taxes on individuals making $250,000 or more annually.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-IDAHO

Lawmakers seek special session for liability shield law

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A working group of Idaho lawmakers has approved legislation creating a liability shield for protection against lawsuits during declared emergencies such as the coronavirus pandemic. And they want Republican Gov. Brad Little to call the entire Legislature back into session to consider it. A majority of state House and Senate lawmakers on the Judiciary and Rules Working Group on Thursday voted for the plan, saying such a law is needed to protect government, schools and private businesses. Some lawmakers opposed to the legislation say a liability shield would remove incentives for those entities to take precautions. Little's spokeswoman said the governor looks forward to reviewing the report by legislators.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-CANADA-ALASKA

Canada imposes stricter rules for Americans going to Alaska

TORONTO (AP) — Canada’s border agency is announcing stricter rules for Americans travelling through Canada to Alaska amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Canada Border Services Agency says the rearview mirror of cars will be marked with a leave-by date while they are in Canada en route to or from the U.S. state. The U.S. Canada border remains closed to all non-essential travel but Americans and foreigners can drive to and from Alaska provided they follow certain rules. Some Americans had been visiting popular tourist destinations in Canada, such as Banff National Park, after telling border agents they were driving to Alaska.

POT PLANE CRASH PLEA

Man pleads guilty to pot charges after Oregon plane crash

MEDFORD, Ore. (AP) — One of two Idaho men who walked away from a small plane crash in a Medford, Oregon, neighborhood last summer has admitted to marijuana charges related to thousands of dollars worth of concentrated marijuana extract seized after the crash. The Mail Tribune reports Zachary Moore of Boise, Idaho, pleaded guilty last week in U.S. District Court in Medford to having large quantities of hash oil with intent to distribute. Moore admitted that he and alleged co-conspirator Mathew Wayne Thompson purchased over 5-1/2 pounds of butane honey oil June 8, 2019, the same day as the Beech 35 Bonanza they were flying crashed because of mechanical issues, according to court documents.

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