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Study says a warmer worker works better

Posted - Oct. 21, 2004 at 5:20 p.m.



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ITHACA, N.Y., Oct 21, 2004 (United Press International via COMTEX) -- A warmer worker is a better worker, a Cornell University study says.

Chilly workers not only make more errors but cooler temperatures could increase a worker's hourly labor cost by 10 percent. That's the estimate of Alan Hedge, professor of design and environmental analysis and director of Cornell's Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory.

When the office temperature in a month-long study increased from 68 to 77 degrees, typing errors fell by 44 percent and typing output jumped 150 percent.

"The results of our study also suggest raising the temperature to a more comfortable thermal zone saves employers about $2 per worker, per hour," says Hedge, who presented his findings this summer at the 2004 Eastern Ergonomics Conference and Exposition in New York.

Copyright 2004 by United Press International.

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