News / 

Americans getting taller and much heavier



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

WASHINGTON Americans are getting taller on average, but they are much heavier, too, according to government figures released yesterday showing that the U.S. population is, literally, growing.

The findings hold for women, men and children, the National Center for Health Statistics reports.

On average, adult men and women are about an inch taller than they were in 1960 and 25 pounds heavier.

The average body mass index (BMI), a weight-for-height formula used to measure obesity, has tipped across the overweight point from 25 in 1960 to 28 in 2002.

The government's latest report on height and weight shows that the average height of a man aged 20 to 74 went from just over 5 feet 8 inches in 1960 to 5 feet 9 inches in 2002.

The average height of a woman has gone from 5 feet 3 inches to 5 feet 4 inches.

Weights, however, have ballooned. The average weight of an adult man was 166.3 pounds in 1960 and 191 pounds in 2002, while the average weight for women went from 140.2 pounds to 164.3 pounds.

The statistics also show that Americans become overweight by the time they were teenagers.

More than 60 percent of Americans are overweight or obese, with a much higher risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some cancers than people of healthy weight. Reuters

Copyright 2004 NYP Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

KSL Weather Forecast