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Update on the latest in sports:

By The Associated Press | Posted - May. 21, 2020 at 7:07 a.m.



NASCAR-DARLINGTON

Hamlin gets win in rare Wednesday Cup race

DARLINGTON, S.C. (AP) — The rain was kind to Denny Hamlin at Darlington.

Hamlin became the winner of NASCAR’s first Wednesday race in 36 years when rain stopped the event with 20 laps remaining. The Daytona 500 winner was out front but out of fresh tires and trying to hang on when he got unintended help from Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Kyle Busch. The reigning Cup champion caused Chase Elliott to crash eight laps earlier to bring out the caution. A furious Elliott waited for Busch on the apron of the track and flipped Busch the middle finger as he passed.

Busch later admitted he made a mistake and misjudged the gap between cars. He finished second, followed by Sunday’s winner Kevin Harvick, Brad Keselowski and Erik Jones.

Wednesday’s race was delayed 90 minutes by rain after Tuesday’s Xfinity race was washed out.

Hamlin has won three times at Darlington and has two wins this season.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTS

Keystone State working on sports guidelines

UNDATED (AP) — Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf says his state is working on guidelines to allow sporting events and exhibitions to get back to “some semblance of normalcy.”

Wolf said he's been in touch with major professional organizations including NASCAR, the NFL, NHL, Major League Baseball and others to figure out how they can resume competition in the state.

He said he expected his administration will decide in the coming days on guidelines for various venues, sports and activities going forward.

NASCAR’s first Cup race outside the south is slated for Pocono Raceway.

In other developments related to the coronavirus pandemic:

— The NFL is working on a helmet face guard that might provide the same protection as a surgical mask. Atlanta Falcons president Rich McKay says the issue came up about a month ago during a conference call with the league’s competition committee. Many players already wear visors to protect their eyes. McKay says the new mask would cover even more of the face. The medical director of the NFL Players Association tells ESPN's Adam Schefter that league engineers and sports equipment company Oakley are already testing prototypes of the modified mask.

— Washington Redskins rookie receiver Antonio Gandy-Golden says he tested positive for the coronavirus in March and had fully recovered by early April. He says his symptoms were mild and he feels 100% now. Gandy-Golden played the past two seasons at Liberty University, an evangelical college in Virginia that reopened this spring despite the COVID-19 pandemic. The Redskins selected Gandy-Golden in the fourth round.

— The NCAA Division I Council has voted to lift a moratorium on voluntary workouts by football and basketball players effective June 1. The decision comes as a growing number of college leaders express confidence that fall sports will be played in some form. Notre Dame and LSU are among a number of schools that have announced plans to reopen their campuses for the fall semester. A decision on other sports was pending.

— Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith says he thinks football games can be played in Ohio Stadium this fall with 20,000 to 30,000 fans in the stands. Smith thinks that number of fans could be kept at a safe distance from one another in the stadium, which seats about 105,000. Face masks and other precautions would be required to limit the spread of COVID-19. He says he hasn’t figured out yet how spectators would be chosen from among those wanting tickets.

— As the NBA continues to work through multiple return-to-play scenarios, two people with knowledge of the situation say Orlando, Las Vegas and Houston remain under consideration as cities that could host regular-season and playoff games. Wednesday marked the end of the 10th week since the NBA shut down on March 11. The pandemic halted a season that had 259 games left to play, but none of those games have been officially canceled yet.

— The Minnesota Timberwolves are reopening their practice facility for voluntary sessions for players starting Thursday. Only one coach and one player will be allowed on the court at Mayo Clinic Square, across the street from Target Center in downtown Minneapolis. They’ll be required to stay 12 feet apart. Workouts will be limited to 45 minutes, and areas beyond the court will remain closed.

— The Kentucky-Michigan college basketball matchup scheduled for Dec. 6 in London has been postponed until 2022 because of the coronavirus pandemic. And the three-game series has been restructured. The schools were scheduled to highlight the inaugural Basketball Hall of Fame London Showcase doubleheader at the O2 Arena which also included Marist against UMBC. Michigan will now host the Wildcats on Dec. 4 in Ann Arbor before the schools meet in London one year later.

— The Italian soccer federation has given the country’s top three leagues until Aug. 20 to complete their seasons. The federation has also come up with alternative plans if the leagues have to be halted again because of the pandemic. They could resort to playoffs or decide positions by applying coeffecients. The following season is now scheduled to start on Sept. 1. Serie A has been suspended since March 9. There are 12 rounds remaining in the league and the Italian Cup is in the semifinal stage.

— Watford defender Adrian Mariappa says he is one of the six people to test positive from the first round of coronavirus checks in the Premier League and is surprised that he contracted the disease. Mariappa says he has been “scratching my head to try to work out how I might have got coronavirus” because he hasn’t “really left the house apart from some exercise and the odd walk with the kids.” Two members of Watford’s staff also tested positive for COVID-19. Burnley said assistant manager Ian Woan also has contracted the virus.

— The Portuguese soccer federation says six of the 15 stadiums seeking to host matches when the league resumes next month amid the coronavirus pandemic have failed health inspections. All stadiums must comply with a series health measures established by local authorities to be able to host matches. The federation says the stadiums for league leader Porto and second-place Benfica were among the nine stadiums that passed the inspections conducted by local health authorities. The stadiums that failed belong to smaller clubs. They will be allowed to make changes to their venues before another inspection is conducted.

— The head of the organizing committee for the 2022 World Cup says a global recession caused by the coronavirus pandemic could affect the ability of fans to afford to travel to Qatar (KUH'-tur). The World Bank is forecasting a deep recession caused by the shutdown of economic activity around the world. Organizing committee secretary general Hassan Al Thawadi says he is hopeful the tournament will be an opportunity for the world to come together again in November 2022. But he says there are “concerns about the global economy and the ability of fans to be able to afford traveling and afford coming and participating and celebrating the World Cup.”

— The National Rugby League has announced a revised 16-round schedule for the competition following a nearly two-month layoff because of coronovirus restrictions imposed after just two rounds of the season. There will be no paying spectators at matches.

— The governing body of swimming has postponed the short course world championships for a year because of the coronavirus pandemic. FINA says the championships scheduled for December in Abu Dhabi will now be staged Dec. 13-18, 2021, in the United Arab Emirates because of the “the uncertainty related with the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic worldwide.” FINA president Julio C. Maglione says swimming organizers have worked closely with the United Arab Emirates’ authorities and “we believe this is the most suitable solution for all those taking part in this competition.”

— Tokyo Olympic organizing committee CEO Toshiro Muto says there’s a need to take “countermeasures” to combat the coronavirus at next year's postponed games. Muto acknowledged in an on-line news conference today that “there are some in Japan” who are talking about holding the games without fans.

— A drawing that depicts the Tokyo Olympic logo and combines it with features of the COVID-19 virus is being removed from the website of the Foreign Correspondents' Club of Japan. Action to pull the drawing came after the Tokyo Olympic organizing committee demanded the withdrawal and claimed copyright infringement. Club president Khaldon Azhari says the club's lawyers agreed the drawing had likely violated Japan's tight copyright laws. He says the move would not limit the club's freedom of expression, nor its ability to use parody or satire.

NFL-COWBOYS-SMITH

Aldon Smith reinstated by NFL

FRISCO, Texas (AP) — Aldon Smith is getting another chance to resume his once-promising NFL career.

The NFL has conditionally reinstated Smith from an indefinite suspension for off-field issues, allowing the pass rusher to take part in team activities with the Dallas Cowboys. Smith will be able to participate in the Cowboys' virtual offseason program starting next week and can meet with teammates and coaches. He hasn’t appeared in an NFL game since 2015 and was signed to a one-year contract last month despite his uncertain playing status.

Smith was drafted seventh overall by San Francisco in 2011 and had 14 sacks as a rookie. He was an All-Pro in 2012 when he had 19 1/2 sacks and the 49ers reached the Super Bowl.

Smith had several legal issues as a player with the Niners and Raiders.

MLB-ATHLETICS-RENT

A’s say they are unable to pay Coliseum rent

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The Oakland Athletics say they can’t pay their landlord.

The head of the agency that oversees the Oakland Coliseum says the A’s have informed him they had “no ability to pay” the annual $1.2 million rent on the facility.

Henry Gardner tells the Bay Area News Group that the A’s say they’ve been unable to generate revenue because they haven’t used the Coliseum this season. MLB has been in shutdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. Gardner says the Coliseum is willing to negotiate and waive some items in the Athletics lease, but, “we can’t just say no rent.”

Gardner is the interim executive director of the Coliseum authority.

The A’s have made the payment annually for use of the city- and county-owned baseball stadium. The team could face penalties for failure to pay.

The A’s released a statement Wednesday noting the authority hadn’t been able to make the Coliseum available to the team because of the local shelter-in-place directive as well as state and local bans on public gatherings of more than 1,000 people at city facilities.

MLB-PIRATES-KRAMER

Pirates infielder Kramer out 4-6 months after hip surgery

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pittsburgh Pirates infielder Kevin Kramer will miss four to six months while recovering from surgery on his right hip.

The team announced Wednesday that Kramer underwent the procedure last week. The 26-year-old Kramer had been dealing with what the club called “chronic symptoms” while attempting to stay ready for the potential start to the 2020 season.

NCAA-STEPHEN F. AUSTIN

Stephen F. Austin gets postseason bans; agrees to sanctions

HOUSTON (AP) — Stephen F. Austin has received postseason bans and agreed to several sanctions including probation, scholarship reductions and the forfeiture of wins for having low scores on the NCAA's Academic Progress Rate. The sanctions will bar the football, men’s basketball and baseball teams from postseason tournaments for one year.

The three teams were on a nationwide list released Tuesday that faced bans for posting a four-year score below 930. The men's basketball team had the lowest score of any team in Division I at 810. The SFA football program was one of six other Division I teams nationwide that fell below 900, at 894.

NHL-SABRES-GREEN CARD

Sabres fighting for strength and conditioning coach

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The Buffalo Sabres are suing to obtain a green card for their British-born strength and conditioning coach.

The Sabres say federal immigration officials wrongly denied a petition by the team to secure the card for Ed Gannon. The team maintains U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services misstated facts and arbitrarily failed to follow its own rules in denying permanent residency status to Gannon.

Gannon was hired by the Sabres in 2015 while the team was beefing up its player development staff.

The Sabres filed the application for permanent residency on Gannon’s behalf in October. To be granted a green card, Gannon had to demonstrate that he was at the top of his field. The Sabres argued that he proved his abilities under USCIS' criteria.

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