Latest Idaho news, sports, business and entertainment at 9:20 p.m. MDT

By The Associated Press | Updated - May 20, 2020 at 9:20 p.m. | Posted - May 20, 2020 at 3:20 a.m.



YELLOWSTONE BISON ATTACK

Visitor hurt when bison knocks her to ground at Yellowstone

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — Yellowstone National Park officials say a visitor was injured when she was knocked to the ground after getting too close to a bison near the popular Old Faithful Geyser. The visitor, whose name and age have not been released, was injured Wednesday afternoon but refused to be taken to a hospital. Park officials did not provide any details about her injuries. The incident is the first time a bison has injured a visitor this year. Visitors are required to stay at least 25 yards away from large animals, including bison, elk, bighorn sheep, deer, moose and coyotes, and at least 100 yards away from bears and wolves.

ELECTION 2020-IDAHO PRIMARY

Idaho Republican claims state botched mail-in ballot process

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A Republican candidate seeking to represent Idaho in Congress says election officials botched the mail-in primary process. Nicholas Jones in the lawsuit filed Tuesday said the secretary of state’s website became overwhelmed and failed to meet the demand for ballot requests as the 8 p.m. Tuesday deadline loomed. The lawsuit claims some people were denied their only opportunity to prepare to vote. Jones' federal lawsuit seeks to extend the deadline for requesting a ballot until next week. Idaho this year shifted to its first-ever entirely mail-in primary due to the coronavirus pandemic. Jones is challenging Republican U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher.

PROTECTED ADDRESSES-IMPROPERLY RELEASED

Idaho official improperly released private addresses 9 times

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The Idaho Secretary of State’s office says it improperly released the protected addresses of 55 people to several groups and individuals that requested voter information. Addresses used for voter registration and other government documents are generally public, but Idaho state law protects the addresses of some crime victims, law enforcement officers and judges from being released. Deputy Secretary of State Chad Houck confirmed to the Idaho Press that nine individuals or groups were improperly given the unredacted voter information list in recent weeks. The voter registration list includes the names, home addresses and party affiliations of nearly 300,000 Idaho voters.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-IDAHO PLAYGROUND ARREST

Ada County got 300 dispatch calls after playground arrest

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Records show the Ada County emergency dispatch center received hundreds of phone calls after video of an anti-vaccine activist’s arrest at a Meridian playground in Idaho gained popularity on social media last month. The Idaho Statesman reported after reviewing public records that some of the calls were supportive of the Meridian Police Department while others were critical and threatening. Authorities say 40-year-old Sara Walton Brady was arrested and charged with trespassing after taking her children to play on playground equipment closed to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The Ada County sheriff’s office, which oversees the dispatch, declined to comment on the calls.

SNAKE RIVER DAMS

EPA says federal dams raise water temperature in Snake River

LEWISTON, Idaho (AP) — An Environmental Protection Agency report provides details about how federal government dams in the Snake and Columbia river system raise summer water temperatures and hurt endangered salmon runs. The report issued Tuesday said dams on the rivers play a role in raising water temperatures above 68 degrees, which is the point at which the water becomes harmful to salmon and steelhead. The Lewiston Tribune says the report also noted the water in the Snake River often exceeds 68 degrees before it enters Washington from Idaho. The same them happens with water from Columbia River when it enters Washington from Canada.

IDAHO LAND BOARD-REINVESTMENT

Idaho Land Board will stick with timberland-buying strategy

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Gov. Brad Little’s desire to make a significant course change involving a politically charged strategy on how to invest millions of dollars to benefit public schools and other beneficiaries has been rejected by his fellow members on the Idaho Land Board. Little’s motion to permanently move $50 million from a fund intended to buy timberland into market investments on Tuesday failed to get a second and died. The state buying timberland has drawn fierce opposition from timber companies that complain they can’t compete against the state. County commissioners have also complained that counties lose property tax revenue when the state buys land.

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