Kilfoyle Krafts

Posted - Jan. 1, 2004 at 7:23 a.m.



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This is Fred Ball for Zions Bank, speaking on business.

When I pulled into the yard of Kilfoyle Krafts is Price, Utah, I saw what appeared to be a small retail outlet. I assumed it was a small operation to provide industrial tools and building supplies to the construction industry in Carbon County. Once inside the doors, I was amazed to see how much bigger it was from that initial impression from the outside.

Tom Patterick, the owner, greeted me and told me the interesting story of this pioneer company. Fred and Booth Kilfoyle started the company over 60 years ago. They started their business to service the mining companies in the area. They sold tamping equipment and other tools and equipment for the mines. Tom's father Harold bought into an ownership position in the early 1940s. After Fred and Booth died, Harold bought the rest of the business. He passed away about 12 years ago. And Tom has managed the company since.

Today, Kilfoyle Krafts sells very little to the mines but a great deal to the miners and their families. About 60 percent of the business is to industry and 40 percent to individual customers.

I saw lots of hardware, building equipment, building supplies and lots of lumber available for sale. I noticed some unusual lumber stacked in the yard that was very different in color than I would usually see in lumber years. Tom explained to me that this was a very special wood. It was treated lumber that is shipped to markets all over the area. The lumber is moved on a rail into a big tank. It is then treated by having a vacuum take air out of it and introduce chemicals into the wood so that it is basically indestructible. Under proper circumstances this wood would never have to be replaced. In fact, it is even being used as foundations on building projects. There is a big market for this, especially in the South.

Tom sells a great deal of the lumber from the treatment plant for fence posts, and I saw a giant supply of green colored, round posts ready to be delivered.

Kilfoyle Krafts also does "T.S.O." work, which means that customers can bring in their own lumber and Kilfoyle will provide "treated service only."

Kilfolye is a Trustworthy Building Center and has enjoyed the 60 plus years of serving the people of Carbon County.

For Zions Bank, I'm Fred Ball. I'm speaking on business.

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