$6.8M for study aims to reduce suicides after jail time



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Public health researchers in Michigan and Rhode Island are embarking on a study to seek ways to reduce suicides among recently released jail inmates.

Michigan State University announced Tuesday that Jennifer Johnson with the East Lansing school's College of Human Medicine was awarded $6.8 million from the National Institute of Mental Health and National Institute of Justice to help examine the problem.

Johnson, a C.S. Mott endowed professor of public health, will be conducting the study with co-investigator Lauren Weinstock, associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University.

The four-year study known as the SPIRIT Trial, or Suicide Prevention Intervention for at-Risk Individuals in Transition, will follow 800 recently released detainees from the Genesee County Jail in Flint, Michigan, and the Department of Corrections in Cranston, Rhode Island.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Associated Press

    SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

    Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast