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Six officers surrender...Police union denounces charges...Stocks post gains



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BALTIMORE (AP) — All six of the Baltimore police officers who've been charged in the death of Freddie Gray have turned themselves in, just hours after the charges were announced. That word comes from a public safety department spokesman. One of the officers is charged with second-degree murder. The other officers face charges including assault and manslaughter.

BALTIMORE (AP) — The Baltimore police officers' union says a prosecutor has made a rush to judgment by bringing charges against six officers in the death of Freddie Gray. Attorney Michael Davey, who was hired by the union, says he is representing one of the officers, but is speaking on behalf of all of them. Davey says he has never seen such a rush to file charges, and adds that the officers did nothing wrong.

ATLANTA (AP) — Authorities in Atlanta say a woman who was killed by police after firing at them from the backseat of a patrol car had first escaped from her handcuffs. Atlanta Police Chief George Turner says the woman, Alexia Christian, had been arrested seven times by the department -- and had escaped from handcuffs once before. He says it's not clear whether officers searched her before putting her in the car. They'd been investigating a report of a stolen car.

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks have started the new month with a gain, erasing much of yesterday's loss. The Dow industrials are up 183 points for the day, while the S&P 500 gained 22 points and the Nasdaq composite is up 63. Oil prices, which had surged by 20 percent last month, were down by 48 cents today.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A lawyer in St. Louis believes that staff members at a hospital in the city were involved in a scheme decades ago to steal newborn black babies and sell them in private adoptions. Eighteen black women who were told in the 1950s and 1960s that their babies had died soon after birth are now wondering if the babies were actually taken away to be raised by other families. One woman's daughter has now turned up alive, almost 50 years later. The hospital has been closed for 35 years -- but attorney Albert Watkins is still hoping city and state officials can investigate.

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The Associated Press

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