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Man stung hundreds of times at St. George baseball game

(Stace Hall/KSL-TV)


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Estimated read time: 1-2 minutes

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ST. GEORGE — A man was stung between 200 and 300 times, and likely dozens others were attacked by a large swarm of bees at a baseball field Friday morning, emergency officials reported.

The sudden attack broke out shortly after 11 a.m. in the middle of a high school baseball tournament, St. George Fire Capt. Robert Hooper said. The man who was stung as many as 300 times was transported to a nearby hospital, but his body’s reaction wasn’t serious, according to Hooper.

"He was alert and talking to us, and not exhibiting any signs of a severe reaction,” the captain said. "A typical full-grown adult can take quite a few stings.”

Several others were treated for their stings on scene. About two dozen others likely were also stung but didn’t stick around to receive treatment, Hooper said.

The swarm was hosed down and destroyed by the fire department upon arrival.

“Typically we will not destroy bees if they are swarming, (unless) … they are aggressive and attacking people,” Hooper said.

The cause of the attack remains unknown.

"The hive was located right next to the stands at the ball field,” Hooper said. "It could have been anything. It could have been someone stepping on (them) or near (them) or dropping something — or just agitating them, getting them set off."

The field has hosted several baseball games in recent weeks and isn’t known as a problem area for bees, Hooper said.

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Ben Lockhart

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