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2 Davis County inmates praised for turning in handgun

(Davis County Sheriff's Office)


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FARMINGTON — Two Davis County inmates are receiving high praise after they turned in a semi-automatic handgun they found on the side of the freeway.

Jeremy Gerhardt and Abdul Asaddullah were cleaning up trash and fixing holes on the side of I-15 with the Utah Department of Transportation Thursday afternoon. They were working as part of a community service program when Asaddullah looked down and saw something unusual on the road, according to Sgt. DeeAnn Survey with the Davis County Sheriff’s Office.

He picked up a magazine from a handgun and turned it over to check for bullets. When he realized it was full, Asaddullah immediately motioned for the group supervisor to come to where he was. The supervisor was surprised and told the inmates to keep a close watch for the weapon, Survey said.

About 100 yards down the road, Gerhardt noticed the weapon lying in the dirt. He then made sure the safety was on before turning it into the supervisor, Survey said.

“Everybody was completely shocked and thankful and grateful for the honest actions of these two men on the side of the road that day,” Survey said.

It’s highly unusual to find something like this on the side of the freeway," Survey said. "Normally inmates find things like parts of broken tires, trash or paraphernalia."

The Utah Highway Patrol responded to the situation and are currently conducting an investigation. They reported Friday evening that the gun had been stolen from the inside of a West Jordan home gun safe last October. UHP also said the gun was rusted so badly, officers couldn't remove the bullet from the chamber.

Although the Davis County Sheriff’s Office can’t do too much to reward the inmates, officials will be writing a letter to include in their files for a judge to review when the time comes, Survey said.

“After talking to (the inmates), they’re really excited that people are able to look at them in a light other than the criminal one, that their families can look at them and be proud of their actions,” Survey said. “Our jail is in the middle of Davis County and it holds the citizens of Davis County, who just happen to be some of the best citizens in the nation if you want my opinion.”

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Megan Marsden Christensen

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