US cutting military contact with Russia...Phoenix police shooting...Blade-runner trial



Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon says it is suspending exercises and other activities with the Russian military, in light of Moscow's military involvement in Ukraine. A Pentagon spokesman says the U.S. military has "put on hold" all military-to-military engagements, including bilateral meetings, port visits and planning conferences. The spokesman, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby, also says the U.S. calls on Russian forces in the Crimea region of Ukraine to return to their bases.

NEW YORK (AP) — Osama bin Laden's son-in-law has been introduced to prospective jurors in New York. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith (SOO'-lay-mahn AH'-boo GAYTH) is on trial on charges that he conspired to kill Americans and support terrorists in his role as al-Qaida's spokesman after 9/11. The goal is to shrink a pool of dozens of prospective jurors to the 12 anonymous jurors and several alternates necessary before opening statements begin Wednesday or Thursday.

PHOENIX (AP) — A shooting in Phoenix today has left a police officer dead, another in critical condition and a suspect dead. The dead and wounded officers were part of a fugitive apprehension team serving a felony warrant. Police say there was a shootout after the suspected caused a three-car collision and attempted to flee on foot.

PRETORIA, South Africa (AP) — Testimony has been offered in the South African murder trial of double-amputee Olympic runner Oscar Pistorius. A neighbor testified that she heard four gunshots and the "blood-curdling screams" of a woman. Prosecutors allege that Pistorius shot his girlfriend, Reva Steenkamp, after an argument. Pistorius says he fired the gun through his bathroom door because he thought an intruder was in his home.

CHICAGO (AP) — A government study finds that most people who abuse addictive prescription painkillers get them for free from friends or relatives. The study concludes that people who abuse drugs almost daily get prescriptions from one or more doctors. The study was published online today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Tags

World
The Associated Press

    SIGN UP FOR THE KSL.COM NEWSLETTER

    Catch up on the top news and features from KSL.com, sent weekly.
    By subscribing, you acknowledge and agree to KSL.com's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

    KSL Weather Forecast