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Firework stand uses QR codes to let customers preview before they buy

Firework stand uses QR codes to let customers preview before they buy



Estimated read time: 2-3 minutes

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CLEARFIELD — As firework stands open for business, one Utah vendor has created a way for buyers to preview what they're getting before they check out.

Most accidents begin at a firework stand, not at the fault of the sellers but because buyers more often than not don't know what they've purchased.

From Sea Monsters to Glitter Glitters, it can be hard to know which fireworks spark up, crackle sideways or just fizzle. Brian Nelson, owner of Fireworks Frenzy, says there's an app for that.

"If they scan this product and they notice it has aerial shots then they realize it's an aerial product before even talking with one of the employees in the stand," Nelson said.

Nelson created a way for customers to pull up a linked video on their cellphones to show them exactly what each firework will do. The first step is to download a QR code app.


If you're seeing what the thing is presumably going to do before you actually purchase it ... it's going to allow you the extra space you need for clearances and keep the public viewing away.

–Martha Ellis


"As soon as you come up to that code, as long as that code is in your window it will recognize it and redirect your phone via whatever web service you use and go right to the video," he said.

Nelson came up with the idea after he wanted to know how his own fireworks would perform.

"The answers I got were, 'There is lots of color or there is lots of crackle,' " he said. "That just wasn't enough for me."

One curious customer used the app for the first time and was happy to learn which fireworks are OK to light near his home.

"I do have areas around my place where we have long grass from neglected houses and things like that," said Darwin Kelsey, a fireworks shopper.

Firefighters hope other people will also use the videos for safety. They also hope the videos will decrease firework-related accidents.

"If you're seeing what the thing is presumably going to do before you actually purchase it, let alone light it, it's going to allow you the extra space you need for clearances and keep the public viewing away," said Fire Marshall Martha Ellis with the Salt Lake City Fire Department.

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Devon Dolan

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