News / Utah / 

No AC leaves some students dealing with unbearable heat

By Nkoyo Iyamba | Posted - Aug. 29, 2012 at 5:35 p.m.


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MAGNA — While it's hot outside, imagine how hot it gets inside a school classroom with no air conditioning.

At least four school districts in Utah have schools without air conditioning, which makes for a hot week back to school.

Students at Cyprus High School are trying to cope with the heat. Some of them are complaining of dehydration and migraines because of the heat.

"It's like, 90–100 degrees in there," Amina Ristemi said. "It's beyond hot. You're just like about to faint and die. it's just so gross, you sweat a lot."

Alec Nagel added that "you can't even make it up the steps without sweating to death."

They're not alone ...
Granite is not the only school dealing with hot classrooms.

In Davis, only five out of 86 schools have air conditioning.

In Weber, 20 of its 42 schools have air conditioning.

Canyons is installing air conditioners in the last three schools right now.

Jordan District has three schools without air, and no plans for now to change that.

And parents are worried about their kids. Jennifer Andreason has a daughter here at Cyprus.

"It's really concerning that kids have to be in this heat and try to concentrate on schoolwork when they're hot," she said.

School officials agree.

"With temperatures getting up to around 90 degrees in some of our classrooms, it can be quite a distraction to the learning process," Ben Horsley, with Granite School District, said. ‘It's not a very good learning environment."

Over the past three years, a $64 million bond has paid to install air conditioning in all Granite district schools.

Cyprus is one of the last to get central air, but by November, all 92 schools will have it.

But that's little comfort for Andreason.

"They should've already had this done and taken care of," she said.

Photos

Nkoyo Iyamba

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