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Teenager sings on a corner to sell produce

By Keith McCord | Posted - Jul. 27, 2012 at 5:58 p.m.


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SANDY — A local teenager has taken his sales skills to a whole new level by adding live entertainment to his presentation. He plays guitar and sings to attract customers to his street stand.

17-year-old Brock Damjanovich works at the produce stand, owned by Harward Farms out of Springville. The family-owned company has been around for years, and has stands like these throughout Salt Lake and Utah Counties. The produce stand is located in Sandy at 106th S. 7th East, and that's where Damjanovich stands in his bare feet with his cowboy hat, strumming his guitar.

"I'll sit there, and learn a couple new songs every morning and then I'll pace the sidewalk and pace here and then someone will come and I'll flip my guitar around behind me and say ‘How can I help you?' " Damjanovich said.


I had a harmonica in the car, and just playing my harmonica, and then I thought, 'this is fun.' So I brought my guitar in and I've been playing on the corner ever since.

–Brock Damjanovich


Damjanovich, a senior at Alta High, is very into music, and got his first guitar at age nine. When he started this part-time job, he wanted to do something that would help make the long, hot work days go by faster.

"I had a harmonica in the car, and just playing my harmonica, and then I thought, ‘this is fun. I think I'm going to bring my guitar next time.' So I brought my guitar in and I've been playing on the corner ever since."

There are only about 10 songs on Brock's playlist since his audience doesn't stay long. And as you might expect, he gets some interesting reaction from passing motorists. They take pictures, honk, wave and yell.

Brock's boss supports this "troubadour of the produce" figuring that if he can turn some heads, then he may also get people to turn into the parking lot to buy.

"You know a lot of people don't know what we do, and don't know what we sell, so we hope we can get their eyes once or twice and maybe they'll stop the next time," said Abrielle Davies, the regional manager for Harward Farms.

These produce stands offer watermelons, cherries, zucchinis, or onions and are open until early October with items changing as the growing season progresses.

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Keith McCord

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