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Santorum backs Liljenquist, Love on Politico and Utahns on partisanship

Santorum backs Liljenquist, Love on Politico and Utahns on partisanship

By Stephanie Grimes | Posted - Jun. 18, 2012 at 11:38 a.m.



This archived news story is available only for your personal, non-commercial use. Information in the story may be outdated or superseded by additional information. Reading or replaying the story in its archived form does not constitute a republication of the story.

SALT LAKE CITY — Rick Santorum reiterated Sunday his support of Dan Liljenquist over U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch.

"It's not Orrin Hatch's seat. It wasn't my seat when I was in the United States Senate. Nobody owns it, your name is not inscribed on that seat," Santorum said on CNN's "State of the Union." "The people of Utah, just like the people of every other state, have an opportunity every time to assess who's the right person at the time."

Santorum endorsed Liljenquist on Friday. The former presidential candidate, who served with Hatch from 1995- 2007, called Hatch a "good man," but said Liljenquist is the "stronger conservative" in the race.

"In a deeply conservative state like Utah, we must elect authentic conservatives," Santorum said. "I believe Dan Liljenquist is that candidate."

Mia Love featured on Politico's "Arena" debate

Mia Love is Monday's featured candidate on Politico's "The Arena" debate.

Politico touts "The Arena" as a "daily debate with policymakers and opinion shapers."


In a deeply conservative state like Utah, we must elect authentic conservatives.

–Rick Santorum


The question Monday was whether Mia Love can "turn the tide for black voters, GOP?"

Utahns concerned about partisan politics

A new report from the Utah Foundation found that partisan politics is an increasing concern for Utahns, and that Utahns are turning out to vote in increasingly lower numbers.

The report found that 52 percent of respondents were concerned or very concerned about partisan politics, marking the first time the issue made an appearance as a concern.

It was also noted that the state's voter turnout rate has been in decline for several decades, falling below the U.S. average in recent years.

Utahns' perception of whether their votes make a difference in a race plays an important role in voter turnout, research has found. And the number of uncompetitive political races in the state may be partially to blame, according to the report.

"(Utah's) registration laws, closed primaries, and caucus and convention system all pose barriers to voting" and may also influence turnout, the report claims.

Romney speaks at Christian conference, strengthens Santorum support

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney spoke Saturday via satellite to the Faith and Freedom Coalition conference in Washington, D.C.

Romney spoke on values to the conservative group, saying that young people should get married before having children because "the opportunity for a mom and a dad to help guide the life of a child gives them such an enormous advantage."

The candidate spoke out against Obamacare, saying it "attacks our first freedom: religious freedom." He also said raising taxes "attacks freedom."


(Utah's) registration laws, closed primaries, and caucus and convention system all pose barriers to voting.

–Utah Foundation report


Former presidential hopeful Rick Santorum was vocal in his support of Romney, taking a stronger position than he had taken when he first endorsed the candidate.

Santorum said he had been afraid Romney would become more moderate as the campaign progressed, but that he was "not seeing that."

"I'm seeing him stand by the convictions he had during the primaries," Santorum said.

Ann Romney stands up to protesters

Ann Romney stood up to Democratic protesters this weekend at an Ohio rally.

"Go home Romney! Go home Romney!" the protesters shouted in unison while Romney introduced her husband.

"We got some distractors out there, but... we can be just as loud about how much we love this country," she said.

Presidential hopeful Mitt Romney ignored the protesters as he took the stage, speaking loudly but refusing to react to them. This was a change from previous speeches, when Romney would often pause to acknowledge protesters' presence.

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Stephanie Grimes

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